Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Offering a petition; supplicatory.
  • Containing a petition or request.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Supplicatory; making a petition.
  • adjective Containing a petition; of the nature of a petition.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective supplicatory; making a petition
  • adjective Containing a petition; of the nature of a petition.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective of the nature of or expressing a petition

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I don’t believe in petitionary or intercessory prayer.

    Just Like A Prayer | Her Bad Mother

  • And as go wishes, so go petitionary and intercessory prayers.

    Just Like A Prayer | Her Bad Mother

  • William James—the nineteenth-century American pioneer in psychology and the psychology of religion, specifically—argued that petitionary prayer would be a problematic practice for Christianity in the modern age.

    Beginner’s Grace

  • He was the most articulate, if not the first, American to predict that as petitionary prayer was brought forward into a science-based world, it would be seen increasingly as inelegant and intellectually embarrassing, especially when placed alongside the marvels of science and scientific medicine.

    Beginner’s Grace

  • Because we are not perfect and because our own desire for the safety of those we care for may overwhelm our sense of justice or duty, the Christian concludes a petitionary prayer with “Not my will but Thine, Lord.”

    Beginner’s Grace

  • He was the most articulate, if not the first, American to predict that as petitionary prayer was brought forward into a science-based world, it would be seen increasingly as inelegant and intellectually embarrassing, especially when placed alongside the marvels of science and scientific medicine.

    Beginner’s Grace

  • William James—the nineteenth-century American pioneer in psychology and the psychology of religion, specifically—argued that petitionary prayer would be a problematic practice for Christianity in the modern age.

    Beginner’s Grace

  • Because we are not perfect and because our own desire for the safety of those we care for may overwhelm our sense of justice or duty, the Christian concludes a petitionary prayer with “Not my will but Thine, Lord.”

    Beginner’s Grace

  • I remember a woman who came to Mass every day at Dolores Mission, and during the time of petitionary prayer she always said the same thing: Por los pecadores, para que ELLOS ...

    Tattoos on the Heart

  • Because we are not perfect and because our own desire for the safety of those we care for may overwhelm our sense of justice or duty, the Christian concludes a petitionary prayer with “Not my will but Thine, Lord.”

    Beginner’s Grace

Comments

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  • "I was hardly moved to come to thee; but being assured none but myself could move thee, I have been blown out of your gates with sighs; and conjure thee to pardon Rome and thy petitionary countrymen."

    - William Shakespeare, 'The Tragedy of Coriolanus'.

    August 29, 2009