Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A deciduous North American larch tree (Larix laricina) having short needles borne on spur shoots.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Any of several North American larches, of the genus Larix; the wood from such a tree

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The American larch; also, the larch of Oregon and British Columbia (Larix occidentalis). See hackmatack, and larch.
  • n. The black pine (Pinus Murrayana) of Alaska, California, etc. It is a small tree with fine-grained wood.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The black or American larch, or hackmatack, Larix Americana, found in moist uplands in British America, and of less size massed in cool swamps in the northern United States.
  • n. The abundant black or ridge-pole pine, Pinus Murrayana, of the Sierras and dry gravelly interior regions of western North America. The allied Pinus contorta, or scrub-pine, of the coast may be also included under the name.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. medium-sized larch of Canada and northern United States including Alaska having a broad conic crown and rust-brown scaly bark

Etymologies

Canadian French tamarac, probably of Algonquian origin.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Believed to derive from an Algonquian word. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • Oh, to see the tamaracks all turn to yellow like maple trees in the fall! Still, I wonder if Scarlet Tanagers ever visit boreal forests where tamaracks dwell. A case of poetic license?

    September 20, 2009


  • A ball of fire shoots through the tamarack
    In scarlet splendor, on voluptuous wings;
    Delirious joy the pyrotechnist brings,
    Who marks for us high summer’s almanac.

    - Joel Benton, 'The Scarlet Tanager'.

    September 20, 2009