Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Having thick leaves; also, thickly set with leaves.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Inspired by something he saw on the Food Network, Mr. Duval figured out a way to use some of his favorite things—peppery bacon and the local sweet Walla Walla onions—with the thick-leaved, cold-weather greens.

    One Big Table

  • Even the last survivors of a vigilante raid long ago have filed the tragic events of that autumn night away, totally unaware of the evil that remains, dormant, but forever patient, among the tall pines and thick-leaved kudzu of a place known only as Hell Hollow.

    Archive 2009-02-01

  • Believe it or not, there's a man who lives right near us who does the same thing -- plants tomatoes and thick-leaved plants outside his courtyard wall, then shoots anything that comes near them.

    Why Are We Still Trying to Conquer Nature?

  • As many as 30 different species grow, among them Alpine bartsia Bartsia alpina, Alpine bistort Polygonum viviparum, Unalaska fleabane Erigeron humilis and thick-leaved whitlow grass Draba crassifolia.

    Ilulissat Icefjord, Denmark-Greenland

  • He made out the ancient broken-paved avenue, wandering away to the south, lost amid clustering masses of fronds and thick-leaved bushes.

    The Conquering Sword Of Conan

  • He made out the ancient broken-paved avenue, wandering away to the south, lost amid clustering masses of fronds and thick-leaved bushes.

    The Conquering Sword of Conan

  • As the American, she knew hot climates of thick-leaved trees and spices and fruits where they grew, and something of the ways of the native people.

    THE DIAMOND

  • As the American, she knew hot climates of thick-leaved trees and spices and fruits where they grew, and something of the ways of the native people.

    THE DIAMOND

  • As the American, she knew hot climates of thick-leaved trees and spices and fruits where they grew, and something of the ways of the native people.

    THE DIAMOND

  • Some varieties are tender when raw, while thick-leaved varieties are chewy and less suitable for salads.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

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