Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Any of several trees or shrubs of the genus Laburnum, especially L. anagyroides, which is cultivated for its drooping clusters of yellow flowers.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Any tree of genus Laburnum, which have bright yellow flowers and are poisonous.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A small leguminous tree (Cytisus Laburnum), native of the Alps. The plant is reputed to be poisonous, esp. the bark and seeds. It has handsome racemes of yellow blossoms.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A small leguminous tree, Cytisus Laburnum, a native of the Alps and neighboring mountains, much cultivated for the beauty of its pendulous racemes of yellow peashaped flowers.
  • n. One of numerous other species of the same genus, or of some similar plants of other genera.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. flowering shrubs or trees having bright yellow flowers; all parts of the plant are poisonous

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

New Latin Laburnum, genus name, from Latin laburnum, broad-leaved bean-trefoil, perhaps of Etruscan origin.

Examples

  • Irishman dwelling with Englishmen, was directed to have a bow of his own height made of yew, wych-hazel, ash, or awburne -- that is, laburnum, which is still styled "awburne saugh," or awburne willow, in many parts of Scotland.

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 13, No. 369, May 9, 1829

  • The windows were open, and the orioles were singing in the great elm-tree, and the laburnum was a bower of gold.

    Margaret Montfort

  • Tabex tablets contain cytosine, a substance found in the seeds of a tree called laburnum that produces yellow pea-flowers, which mimics the effect of nicotine.

    The Seattle Times

  • The laburnum is the train, and there are the signal-boxes, and the road up to here — and those fat red daisies are us three waving to the old gentleman — that’s him, the pansy in the laburnum train.”

    The Railway Children

  • The laburnum is the train, and there are the signal-boxes, and the road up to here -- and those fat red daisies are us three waving to the old gentleman -- that's him, the pansy in the laburnum train. "

    The Railway Children

  • A sheltering stand of laburnum surrounding an abandoned and unappreciated statue of Leda and her swan.

    Earl of Durkness

  • Cat pointed toward the shrubbery, the secluded stand of laburnum, Leda and her god hidden away in eternal orgasm.

    Earl of Durkness

  • A cock yellowhammer sings insistently from a laburnum tree as I quit the lanes and walk woodland paths where last anemones wilt into emerald moss.

    Country diary: Harlech

  • And this is the thought he has with him as he passes through the yellow laburnum flowers without ducking, like he usually does.

    The Redleys

  • They duck under the flowers of a laburnum tree and Clara knows that her brother wants to say something else.

    The Redleys

Comments

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  • "Philip straggled away to the window and looked out dismally at the soaked lawn and the dripping laburnum trees, and the row of raindrops hanging fat and full on the iron gate."

    The Magic City by E. Nesbit, p 3 of the SeaStar Books paperback edition

    October 28, 2010