Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A decorative trimming of twisted ribbon or cord, used especially on hats.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. a decoration, especially on hats, made from twisted ribbon

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A twisted cord; also, a molded or worked ornament of similar form.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A twisted or spiral molding, a twisted cord, or other ornament.

Etymologies

French, from tors, from Vulgar Latin *torsus, alteration of Latin tortus, past participle of torquēre, to twist; see terkw- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
French tors ("twisted") + -ade. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • "But for your Majesty to put yourself in the king's power?" ventured a courtier, who wore a begemmed torsade and a cloak of Genoa velvet.

    Under the Rose

  • "New data demonstrate that Anzemet injection can increase the risk of developing torsade de pointes, an abnormal heart rhythm, which in some cases can be fatal," the FDA said at the time.

    Thestar.com - Home Page

  • I'd also bought a cabbage at the market last week because it was so pretty, with it's gentle torsade-like swirl.

    David Lebovitz

  • For upper relief, usual thioridazine or candy, sleep questions of sign in your mouth, or appetite a torsade substitute.

    Wii-volution

  • Quadramet is a nolvadex clenbuterol cycle of the torsade class harmful radiopharmaceuticals.

    Wii-volution

  • Vaginal lifting can hold if you are formerly removing your doctor's levels carefully or if you nolvadex fotki of a lifetime, one in eight subtypes will happen intended with torsade cancer.

    Wii-volution

  • In some drugs, QT prolongation has been associated with torsade de pointes, a potentially fatal arrhythmia.

    BioSpace.com Featured News and Stories

Comments

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  • "'...To tell me whether those whorls, or perhaps I should say those torsades or undulations, and those spirals running from the base to the very tip add strength or possibly elasticity to the whole improbable structure.'"
    --Patrick O'Brian, The Hundred Days, 28–29

    March 20, 2008