Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A series of contests in which a number of contestants compete and the one that prevails through the final round or that finishes with the best record is declared the winner.
  • n. A medieval martial sport in which two groups of mounted and armored combatants fought against each other with blunted lances or swords.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. During the Middle Ages, a series of battles and other contests designed to prepare knights for war.
  • n. A series of games; either the same game played many times, or a succession of games related by a single theme; played competitively to determine a single winning team or individual.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A mock fight, or warlike game, formerly in great favor, in which a number of combatants were engaged, as an exhibition of their address and bravery; hence, figuratively, a real battle.
  • n. Any contest of skill in which there are many contestents for championship.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n.
  • n. A tourney. See tourney and just.
  • n. In later times, a contest of skill in which men on horseback riding at full speed strove to carry off on their spears a certain number of rings hung just over their heads.
  • n. Encounter; shock of battle.
  • n. Any contest of skill in which a number of persons take part: as, a chess tournament.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a series of jousts between knights contesting for a prize
  • n. a sporting competition in which contestants play a series of games to decide the winner

Etymologies

Middle English tournement, a medieval sport, from Old French torneiement, from torneier, to tourney; see tourney.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Old French tornoiement (Modern French tournoiement) from the verb tornoier. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.