Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of trick.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He practiced coin tricks from a book he found in the wasteland of the prison library; and he worked out; and he made lists in his head of what he'd do when he got out of prison.

    Excerpt: American Gods by Neil Gaiman

  • That’s not only because people aren’t good at estimating serving sizes of low-fat foods, so they eat up to 50 percent more calories than they would of the “full-fat” version, it’s also because the lingo tricks you into thinking those products are good for you.

    You: On a Diet

  • That’s not only because people aren’t good at estimating serving sizes of low-fat foods, so they eat up to 50 percent more calories than they would of the “full-fat” version, it’s also because the lingo tricks you into thinking those products are good for you.

    You: On a Diet

  • That’s not only because people aren’t good at estimating serving sizes of low-fat foods, so they eat up to 50 percent more calories than they would of the “full-fat” version, it’s also because the lingo tricks you into thinking those products are good for you.

    You: On a Diet

  • The bag of tricks is filling, but to pull out objects in the right order we need to go back to basics and ask whom the characters are.

    The Primordial Stew Of Imagination, Part 2 « The Graveyard

  • I did that for two solid years, preceded by two solid years of supervisor work, and there are certain tricks I learned to keeping your poise.

    Writer Unboxed » Blog Archive » Public Speaking

  • One of his favorite tricks is to find a tasty bit and play with it until my wife cannot stand it anymore!

    Best Gun Dog Contest

  • Although Ren professes affection for the United States, he has also called for the dissolution of NATO and says he thinks the United States is engaged in "tricks aimed at undermining China's international environment in order to contain it."

    History of telecom company illustrates lack of strategic trust between U.S., China

  • One of his favorite tricks is to find a tasty bit and play with it until my wife cannot stand it anymore!

    Best Gun Dog Contest

  • The bag of tricks is filling, but to pull out objects in the right order we need to go back to basics and ask whom the characters are.

    2009 November « The Graveyard

Comments

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  • This can be a meta page for them tricky Wordie tricks.

    Today's lesson is how to find out who added a particular tag. This is all thanks to the fact that Google loves Wordie. When reesetee asked on the word different, "who's the wag who tagged this page 'Monty Python'?"--here's how to answer that.

    1. You'll need to grab the exact text from a tags-page listing as to the exact phrase, so we can put this in QUOTES into Google. In this case, it's "monty python has been used" -- stick that into Google with one more important part--     site:wordie.org

    So in this example, here's what you'd type into google:

    "monty python has been used" site:wordie.org

    Sometimes, You'll get the exact culprit right here, ta-da!

    BUT, if it's a popular/shared tag, you'll get a few culprits. This is where you'd grab the URL that lists people's unique tags:

    http://wordie.org/tags/monty%20python?u=USERNAME

    You'll just keep replacing the USERNAME with whoever appears on that Google results list, and it should take less than a minute to discover the tagger. In the case of different/monty python, it's SonofGroucho.

    The downside to this technique is that Google's search-data may not be up-to-date (sometimes this takes days) and is certainly not instantaneous.

    November 8, 2008

  • Thanks, whichbe--although it was a rhetorical question in that particular instance. :-)

    November 10, 2008

  • If you want to know which number your list is...

    Comment on it, then go to http://wordie.org/comments . On that page, links to lists look like this: http://wordie.org/people/user?wl=number

    December 2, 2008

  • Alternatively, go to the list page and look through the page source for links to URLs like /lists/edit/10258 or /lists/10258?s=a&d=d.

    December 2, 2008

  • I've found Wordie works particular well (read: faster) when utilizing the TABS feature, now found on most browsers. Rather than a ton of open windows, you can have many tabs within the same window. In Windows, this is often done with a mouse-rightclick and then Open New Tab. On OS-X (Mac), it is often Apple-click.

    (Apologies to those for whom this is obvious; I have recently discovered there's a great number of people who do not know about this feature.)

    December 31, 2008

  • Oh, the tab feature and I are very close friends. Very close.

    All right, I'll admit it, we live together.

    December 31, 2008

  • Here's a faster way to link to users and lists that are listed in the right column of a page that is already open:

    select the text (e.g. "Wordie for dummies!" on this page) and right-click it. Then click "View selection source" (in Firefox), and the HTML tag will show up in a new window, ready to use.

    January 27, 2010

  • • Wordie for dummies!

    January 28, 2010

  • Also 3rd person singular of the verb 'to trick'.

    November 21, 2011