Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Extending or being beyond the world or the limits of the universe.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. extraordinary; abnormal
  • adj. extraterrestrial; outside of earth or the universe

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Being beyond the world, or beyond the limits of our system.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Being beyond the world, or beyond the limits of the solar system: as, ultramundane spaces.
  • Being beyond this world, or the physical sphere of existence.

Etymologies

Latin ultrāmundānus : ultrā-, ultra- + mundānus, of the world; see mundane.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Latin ultra + mundanus. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Eddie TulasiewiczLondon• Some of us can only dream of appearing in a crossword clue Letters, 15 February, but the bishop of Cyprus and the Gulf did once call me the Keith Flett of the Church of England, which, as episcopal imprimaturs go, is surely approaching ultramundane.

    Letters: Facts are sacred

  • “To ask why there is perception and appetite in simple substances is to inquire about something ultramundane, so to speak, and to demand reasons of God why he has willed things to be such as we conceive them to be” (GP ii, 271/L 538).

    Leibniz on Causation

  • The tempter asks Jesus to make himself superior to God; Jesus's rejection of that temptation, Ratzinger suggests, reminds us that "to do that is to abase not only God, but the world and oneself, too" - a suggestion confirmed by the murderous depredations of those twentieth-century totalitarians who made ultramundane gods out of themselves.

    A Jesus Beyond Politics

  • For, although in the abstract we all love beauty, and although, if we were sent naked souls into some ultramundane warehouse of soul-less bodies and told to select one to our liking, we should each choose a handsome one, and never think of the consequences, -- it is quite certain that beauty carries an atmosphere of repulsion as well as of attraction with it, alike in both sexes.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 05, No. 31, May, 1860

  • Nature regulating ultramundane phenomena, as fixed, as invariable, as those which decide the succession of geological phenomena and the products of chemical combinations.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 12, No. 71, September, 1863

  • Charles Knollys was gone, utterly gone; no more to be met with by his girl-wife, save as spirit to spirit, soul to soul, in ultramundane place.

    Mrs. Knollys

  • For, although in the abstract we all love beauty, and although, if we were sent naked souls into some ultramundane warehouse of soulless bodies and told to select one to our liking, we should each choose a handsome one, and never think of the consequences, -- it is quite certain that beauty carries an atmosphere of repulsion as well as of attraction with it, alike in both sexes.

    Complete Project Gutenberg Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. Works

  • Pray who can tell what would be the consequence of a visit from some of the inhabitants of Saturn, or the Georgium Sidus, should they open up their ultramundane treasures in sight of the British court?

    A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels — Volume 13

  • If they perceive its animal basis they cannot conceive its ideal affinities or understand what is meant by calling it divine; if they perceive its ideality and see the immortal essences that swim into its ken, they hotly deny that it is an animal faculty, and invent ultramundane places and bodiless persons in which it is to reside; as if those celestial substances could be, in respect to thought, any less material than matter or, in respect to vision and life, any less instrumental than bodily organs.

    The Life of Reason

  • a chance contribution towards the probabilities of ultramundane intercourse, -- as material for thought, -- as one of those hints which future facts may render valueless, but which, on the other hand, other observed phenomena may possibly serve to work out and corroborate and explain.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 16, No. 97, November, 1865

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