Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Not diverted; not turned aside.
  • Not amused; not entertained or pleased.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Not diverted

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And yet the liberals who rallied to Ms. Stewart's defense are undiverted from their belief that government should have a great deal to say about how people live their lives.

    Descent Into Legal Hell

  • After years of undiverted mental focus and physical exertion, he was in possession of the outline of an impossibly complex master plan used to harbor treasure in the mountains of western Arkansas.

    Shadow of the Sentinel

  • These were rich and abundant; and Catherine had brought home a present to every one — to every one save Morris, to whom she had brought simply her undiverted heart.

    Washington Square

  • Or else the comet's natural, undiverted orbit could just as easily have been too far off to even contemplate moving it.

    Roger MacBride

  • In spite of the serene and placid look of the old houses, one who has always known them cannot help thinking of the sorrows of these farms and their almost undiverted toil.

    The White Rose Road

  • It was gratifying to get rid of so provocative an issue; doubly so because conditions at Mount Vernon called for the undiverted attention of the owner.

    Washington

  • It was gratifying to get rid of so provocative an issue; doubly so because conditions at Mount Vernon called for the undiverted attention of the owner.

    Washington

  • It was gratifying to get rid of so provocative an issue; doubly so because conditions at Mount Vernon called for the undiverted attention of the owner.

    Washington

  • It was gratifying to get rid of so provocative an issue; doubly so because conditions at Mount Vernon called for the undiverted attention of the owner.

    Washington

  • Christianity, keeping pure in its spirit and undiverted from its purpose, has yet not hesitated to adapt its outward forms to the tough popular traditions which it found deeply rooted in the soil where it sought to grow, thus making itself "all things to all men, that it might by all means save some."

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 04, No. 23, September, 1859

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