Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To deprive of a helm or helmet.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb To deprive of the helm or helmet.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb transitive To remove the helm from.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

un- +‎ helm

Examples

  • He descended into the lists, and commanded them to unhelm the conquered champion.

    Ivanhoe

  • “Come, valiant sir,” said Wamba, “I must be your armourer as well as your equerry — I have dismounted you, and now I will unhelm you.”

    Ivanhoe

  • They walked back to the ship, climbed the ladder, and were glad to close the port upon the dead white glare, to unhelm in the blue glow of the interior.

    Galactic Derelict

  • He descended into the lists, and commanded them to unhelm the conquered champion.

    The Junior Classics — Volume 5

  • ` ` Come, valiant sir, '' said Wamba, ` ` I must be your armourer as well as your equerry --- I have dismounted you, and now I will unhelm you. ''

    Ivanhoe

  • He descended into the lists, and commanded them to unhelm the conquered champion.

    Ivanhoe

  • Then the servant cut short my thoughts, and led us to the bishop, bidding me unhelm first.

    A Thane of Wessex

  • But for the sake of what had been I was fain to unhelm for

    A Prince of Cornwall A Story of Glastonbury and the West in the Days of Ina of Wessex

  • "Come, valiant sir," said Wamba, "I must be your armourer as well as your equerry -- - I have dismounted you, and now I will unhelm you."

    Ivanhoe. A Romance

  • He descended into the lists, and commanded them to unhelm the conquered champion.

    Ivanhoe. A Romance

Comments

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  • Whether from love of form, or from curiosity, the marshals paid no attention to his expressions of reluctance, but unhelmed him by cutting the laces of his casque, and undoing the fastening of his gorget. When the helmet was removed, the well-formed, yet sun-burnt features of a young man of twenty-five were seen, amidst a profusion of short fair hair.

    --Ivanhoe, Chapter XII, by Sir Walter Scott

    January 10, 2011