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Examples

  • I detect an idea that the spontaneous use of tú or usted is an indication not of the relationship itself but of the way in which the speaker would like to present him/herself - as a friendly cheerful type or as a more reserved character; and the variation in advertising is interesting and seems to support this idea.

    Where hast tha been?

  • I detect an idea that the spontaneous use of tú or usted is an indication not of the relationship itself but of the way in which the speaker would like to present him/herself - as a friendly cheerful type or as a more reserved character; and the variation in advertising is interesting and seems to support this idea.

    2 posts from May 2007

  • I detect an idea that the spontaneous use of tú or usted is an indication not of the relationship itself but of the way in which the speaker would like to present him/herself - as a friendly cheerful type or as a more reserved character; and the variation in advertising is interesting and seems to support this idea.

    Where hast tha been?

  • As I always say in my many lectures, I only do three things to the questions: edit them for space constraint, clean them up for grammatical purposes and give people a pseudonym I would've called usted Dumbfounded in Denver, but your choice worked.

    Gustavo Arellano: Ask A Mexican!: Good Gabacho/Evil Alabama Edition

  • As I always say in my many lectures, I only do three things to the questions: edit them for space constraint, clean them up for grammatical purposes and give people a pseudonym I would've called usted Dumbfounded in Denver, but your choice worked.

    Gustavo Arellano: Ask A Mexican!: Good Gabacho/Evil Alabama Edition

  • There is the formal "usted" and the familiar (non formal) "tu" that is in constant play when communicating with others in spanish.

    Its a question of idenity . . .

  • There is the formal "usted" and the familiar (non formal) "tu" that is in constant play when communicating with others in spanish.

    Its a question of idenity . . .

  • There is the formal "usted" and the familiar (non formal) "tu" that is in constant play when communicating with others in spanish.

    Its a question of idenity . . .

  • There is the formal "usted" and the familiar (non formal) "tu" that is in constant play when communicating with others in spanish.

    Its a question of idenity . . .

  • There is the formal "usted" and the familiar (non formal) "tu" that is in constant play when communicating with others in spanish.

    Its a question of idenity . . .

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