Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Having a backbone or spinal column.
  • adj. Of or characteristic of vertebrates or a vertebrate.
  • n. A member of the subphylum Vertebrata, a primary division of the phylum Chordata that includes the fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals, all of which are characterized by a segmented spinal column and a distinct well-differentiated head.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Having a backbone.
  • n. An animal having a backbone.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One of the Vertebrata.
  • adj. Having a backbone, or vertebral column, containing the spinal marrow, as man, quadrupeds, birds, amphibia, and fishes.
  • adj. Contracted at intervals, so as to resemble the spine in animals.
  • adj. Having movable joints resembling vertebræ; -- said of the arms of ophiurans.
  • adj. Of or pertaining to the Vertebrata; -- used only in the form vertebrate.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Having vertebræ; characterized by the possession of a spinal column; backboned; in a wider sense, having a notochord, or chorda dorsalis; chordate; specifically, of or pertaining to the Vertebrata. Also vertebrated, and (rarely) vertebral.
  • Same as vertebral: as, a vertebrate theory of the skull.
  • In botany, contracted at intervals, like the vertebral column of animals, there being an articulation at each contraction, as in some leaves.
  • n. A vertebrated animal; any member of the Vertebrata, or, more broadly, of the Chordata: as, ascidians are supposed to be vertebrates.
  • To make a vertebrate of; give a backbone to; hence, figuratively, to give firmness or resolution to.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. having a backbone or spinal column
  • n. animals having a bony or cartilaginous skeleton with a segmented spinal column and a large brain enclosed in a skull or cranium

Etymologies

Latin vertebrātus, having joints, from vertebra, vertebra; see vertebra.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • One species of vertebrate is added to the endangered list each week, IUCN report warns at biodiversity summit?

    One-fifth of world's back-boned animals face extinction, study warns

  • Anyway, a seminal work in vertebrate paleontology, and I didn't have a copy, so thank you.

    "This feeling is not sadness, this feeling is not joy..." (pt. 2)

  • Bio/Rocks is the blog of Sarah, a graduate student in vertebrate paleontology at UC Berkeley.

    Added to the Blogroll

  • Tyrannosaurs, terror birds, touracos and tamanduas: the hottest news in vertebrate palaeontology.

    Archive 2006-04-01

  • I really should stop talking to other people qualified in vertebrate palaeontology.

    Archive 2006-12-01

  • ; it was the most interesting and surprising thing in vertebrate feeding I have seen in several years, Westneat said.

    Moray Eels Attack With Two Jaws | Impact Lab

  • The animal kingdom consists, first, of a sub-kingdom of animals which possess a spinal column, or backbone, and which are known as vertebrate animals.

    Young Folks' Library, Volume XI (of 20) Wonders of Earth, Sea and Sky

  • "This seems to be the first example seen in the wild of a sexual escapade between a mammal and a different kind of vertebrate such as a bird, reptile or fish," although some mammals are known to have attempted sexual relief with inanimate — including dead things — objects, "said researcher Nico de Bruyn, a mammal ecologist at the University of Pretoria in South Africa."

    Fur Seal Caught Molesting Penguin « Skid Roche

  • This seems to be the first example seen in the wild of a sexual escapade between a mammal and a different kind of vertebrate such as a bird, reptile or fish, “although some mammals are known to have attempted sexual relief with inanimate — including dead things — objects,” said researcher Nico de Bruyn, a mammal ecologist at the University of Pretoria in South Africa.

    Again I stand corrected :) « Bound, Not Gagged

  • The existence of the so-called “hox paradox” – the deployment of homologous genes and their protein products in the development of classically non-homologous structures, such as vertebrate and arthropod eyes – has been one of the most widely-discussed topics in evo-devo over the past decade.

    Dembski vs. Evo Devo - The Panda's Thumb

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.