Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In pharmacy, a solution of a medicinal substance in wine; also, wine.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun Wine, -- chiefly used in Pharmacy in the name of solutions of some medicinal substance in wine; as: vina medicata, medicated wines; vinum opii, wine of opium.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Buglossalum, or borage wine before mentioned, which [4267] Mizaldus calls vinum mirabile, a wonderful wine, and

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Yet, in the other instances, we find the word postposed to other nouns such as vinum and esvi, the latter term probably being another kind of sacred offering.

    Etruscan "esi"... What is it?

  • Various monstrances and cruets (note the As and Vs for aqua and vinum) from the Cathedral treasure:

    Catholic Bamberg: The Vestments of Pope Clement II and Other Treasures from the Diocesan Museum

  • Consequently, we're led to believe that Etruscan vinum, which was identical with the Latin, was simply borrowed.

    The diffusion of the Italian terms for 'wine' from Etruscan

  • The remaining is a suffix -um which is fortunately attested a few times in what appear to be abstract, uncountable derivative nouns expressing concepts of mass or material as in meθlum 'people' (from *meθil 'group') and vinum 'wine' (from vina, also 'wine').

    Archive 2009-07-01

  • Both mirrors suggest nothing more that vinum, mixed perhaps with some venena, was a great help in haruspicy.

    More about egg symbols in Etruria and the rest of the classical world

  • Consequently, we're led to believe that Etruscan vinum, which was identical with the Latin, was simply borrowed.

    Archive 2009-10-01

  • The remaining is a suffix -um which is fortunately attested a few times in what appear to be abstract, uncountable derivative nouns expressing concepts of mass or material as in meθlum 'people' (from *meθil 'group') and vinum 'wine' (from vina, also 'wine').

    The identity of the Etruscan god Tecum

  • Then would I enter keen with hunger, parched with thirst, (da mihi vinum quaeso, et merum sit,) and partake with appetite of whatever was set before us, according to our rule; feast or fast day, caritas or penitentia, was the same to me.

    The Monastery

  • Around the top of each bottle is a Latin motto: "vinum, cantus, amor," or "wine, song, and love."

    Archive 2008-02-01

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