Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. the wane of the moon
  • n. curse
  • n. vengeance

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A word of uncertain signification, used only in the phrase with a wanion, apparently equivalent to with a vengeance, with a plague, or with misfortune.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A word found only in the phrases with a wanion, in the wanton, and wantons on you, generally interpreted to denote some kind of im precation.
  • n. “With a vengeance”; energetically; vehemently; emphatically; hence, in short order; summarily.

Etymologies

Alteration of earlier waniand, from Middle English waniand ("waning"), present participle of wanien ("to wane") (from the phrase "in the waniand [moon]", i.e. in the time of the waning moon, in an unlucky stound). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • McCoy looked thoughtful, then said, "What's a wanion?"

    Doctor’s Orders

  • But, as he pressed upon her with a violence, of which the object could not be mistaken, and endeavoured to secure her right hand, she exclaimed, “Take it then, with a wanion to you!” — and struck him an almost stunning blow on the face, with the pebble which she held ready for such an extremity.

    Woodstock

  • I would worthy and learned Doctor Rochecliffe had been here, with his battery ready-mounted from the Vulgate, and the Septuagint, and what not — he would have battered the presbyterian spirit out of him with a wanion.

    Woodstock

  • But, as he pressed upon her with a violence, of which the object could not be mistaken, and endeavoured to secure her right hand, she exclaimed, "Take it then, with a wanion to you!"

    Woodstock; or, the Cavalier

  • Look how thou stirrest now! come away, or I'll fetch thee with a wanion.

    Pericles

  • I saw how it had been betwixt you, and I sent him out of my company with a wanion — I would rather have a rifler on my perch than a false knave at my elbow — and now, Master Roland, tell me what way wing ye?”

    The Abbot

  • [95] [Old copy, _knew_.] [96] [See Hazlitt's "Proverbs," 1869, p. 478.] [97] [Mr Collier printed _not_.] [98] [Mr Collier printed _only man alive_.] [99] [This and the next line of the dialogue are given in the old copy to Hermione.] [100] [By.] [101] [Old copy, pit_.] [102] _With a wanion_ seems to have been equivalent to "with a witness," or sometimes to "with a curse," but the origin of it is uncertain.

    A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Volume 6

  • Bide doun, with a mischief to ye — bide doun, with a wanion,” cried the king, almost overturned by the obstreperous caresses of the large stag-hounds.

    The Fortunes of Nigel

  • O Ppt, I remember your reprimanding me for meddling in other people’s affairs: I have enough of it now, with a wanion. [

    The Journal to Stella

  • O Ppt, I remember your reprimanding me for meddling in other people's affairs: I have enough of it now, with a wanion. [

    The Journal to Stella

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