Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A form of hygroscope, in the shape of a toy-house, which roughly indicates weather changes by the appearance or retirement of toy images.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • The elder and younger son of the house of Crawley were, like the gentleman and lady in the weather-box, never at home together — they hated each other cordially: indeed, Rawdon

    Vanity Fair

  • The elder and younger son of the house of Crawley were, like the gentleman and lady in the weather-box, never at home together—they hated each other cordially: indeed, Rawdon Crawley, the dragoon, had a great contempt for the establishment altogether, and seldom come thither except when his aunt paid her annual visit.

    X. Miss Sharp Begins to Make Friends

  • In short, the Dutchman and his wife, in the old weather-box, had not less to do with each other than he and I.

    If, Yes and Perhaps Four Possibilities and Six Exaggerations with Some Bits of Fact

  • The elder and younger son of the house of Crawley were, like the gentleman and lady in the weather-box, never at home together -- they hated each other cordially: indeed, Rawdon Crawley, the dragoon, had a great contempt for the establishment altogether, and seldom came thither except when his aunt paid her annual visit.

    Vanity Fair

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  • "A form of hygroscope, in the shape of a toy-house, which roughly indicates weather changes by the appearance or retirement of toy images. In a common form a man advances from his porch in wet and a woman in dry weather—the movement being produced by the varying torsion of a hygroscopic string by which the images are attached."

    - Century Dictionary

    July 31, 2010