Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A kind of raised seedcake.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A kind of raised seedcake.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Compare Dutch wegge a sort of bread, German Weck, originally a wedge-shaped loaf or cake. See wedge.

Examples

  • (called wigg) is drawn off, and the remainder of the contents of the smaller vessel is “sour cream.”

    The Book of Household Management

  • (called wigg) is drawn off, and the remainder of the contents of the smaller vessel is “sour cream.”

    The Book of Household Management

  • Nope, I don't have the strength to see the future and not wigg out about what I see.

    Angels' Blood Countdown: Karen Chance - Curse the Dawn ARC

  • Company with Mr Dyer, who looks just as usual, and cocks his thumbs with the same wigg-despising air as formerly.

    Letter 281

  • Adn dere iyn teh would a piggee-wigg stuud, wif a ryng at teh eynd ov hims noas, hims noas, wif a ryng

    Dis mah hoomin. - Lolcats 'n' Funny Pictures of Cats - I Can Has Cheezburger?

  • One sweetened bread product that included caraway seeds was the wigg - these were eaten with ale and cheese at harvest time, but over time also became a richer, grander bun.

    Archive 2006-09-01

  • The little genlmn settled his wigg, and pulled out his ribbins; the younger one fluffed the dust of his shoes, looked at his whiskers in a little pockit-glas, settled his crevatt; and they both mounted upstairs.

    The Memoirs of Mr. Charles J. Yellowplush

  • One sweetened bread product that included caraway seeds was the wigg - these were eaten with ale and cheese at harvest time, but over time also became a richer, grander bun.

    Seed Cake

  • Ye Boston demoisselle weareth an waterproof guyascutus, [for so methinketh I haue hearde them calld,] and whan that itt rayneth or snoweth, shee rusheth forth as to a carnavall, and heedeth not yf ye powderie snowe-flakes falle on hir daintie littyl nose, or pile up like untoe a chancellor's wigg on hir hed.

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 1, No. 5, May, 1862 Devoted To Literature And National Policy

  • The use of wigs also, at first denounced by the clergy, was at last countenanced by them: in portraits later than 1700 they usually replace the black skull-cap of earlier pictures, and in 1752 the tables had so far turned that a church-member in Newbury refused communion because "the pastor wears a wigg."

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 12, No. 71, September, 1863

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