Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A person who demonstrates an exaggerated conformity or propriety, especially in an irritatingly arrogant or smug manner.
  • noun A petty thief or pickpocket.
  • noun A conceited dandy; a fop.
  • transitive verb To steal or pilfer.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To filch or steal.
  • To cheapen; haggle about.
  • To plead hard; haggle.
  • noun A conceited, narrow-minded, pragmatical person; a dull, precise person.
  • noun A coxcomb; a dandy.
  • noun A thief.
  • noun A small pitcher.
  • noun A small brass skillet.
  • To ride.
  • To dress up; adorn; prink. Compare prick, 9.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • intransitive verb Prov. Eng. & Scot. To haggle about the price of a commodity; to bargain hard.
  • noun A pert, conceited, pragmatical fellow.
  • noun Cant A thief; a filcher.
  • transitive verb Scot. To cheapen.
  • transitive verb Cant To filch or steal.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Scotland To haggle or argue over price.
  • noun A person who demonstrates an exaggerated conformity or propriety, especially in an irritatingly arrogant or smug manner.
  • noun UK A petty thief or pickpocket
  • noun archaic A conceited dandy; a fop.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a person regarded as arrogant and annoying

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Origin unknown.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Of unknown origin.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Of unknown origin.

Examples

Comments

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  • He is a young barrister, with more of the prig than the lawyer about him.

    - Lesage, The Adventures of Gil Blas of Santillane, tr. Smollett, bk 7 ch. 13

    October 2, 2008

  • From p. 83 of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby: "Angry as I was, as we all were, I was tempted to laugh whenever he opened his mouth. The transition from libertine to prig was so complete."

    September 29, 2012