Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Of or moving toward the quarter from which the wind blows.
  • adjective Of or on the side exposed to the wind or to prevailing winds.
  • adverb In a direction from which the wind blows; against the wind.
  • noun The direction from which the wind blows.
  • idiom (to windward) Into or to an advantageous posture or position.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • On the side toward the point from which the wind blows: as, windward shrouds.
  • noun The point from which the wind blows: as, to ply or sail to windward.
  • Toward the wind: opposed to leeward.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The point or side from which the wind blows; ; -- opposed to leeward.
  • noun a figurative expression, signifying to adopt precautionary or anticipatory measures for success or security.
  • adjective Situated toward the point from which the wind blows.
  • adverb Toward the wind; in the direction from which the wind blows.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Towards the wind, or the direction from which the wind is blowing.
  • adjective On the side exposed to the wind.
  • adverb In a direction from which the wind blows, against the wind.
  • noun The direction from which the wind blows.
  • noun The side receiving the wind's force.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective on the side exposed to the wind
  • noun the side of something that is toward the wind
  • adverb away from the wind
  • noun the direction from which the wind is coming

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

wind +‎ -ward

Examples

  • The winds are coming in from the west, so they're blowing up what we call the windward side of the mountain, blowing up and up and up on that snowpack, and then the snow gets deposited on the leeward side.

    CNN Transcript Jan 6, 2007

  • That combined with the heavy snowfall, and the direction of the winds, if we could put Google Earth behind me once again, I just want to show that we're looking at a westerly flow from the winds, and as the winds come up the mountain, this is called the windward side of the mountain, they pile up the snow right here on the top, or peak, of the mountain.

    CNN Transcript Jan 6, 2007

  • A good way to learn to sail to windward is to sail alongside another boat.

    Sailing Fundamentals

  • A good way to learn to sail to windward is to sail alongside another boat.

    Sailing Fundamentals

  • We had a fair wind, which is something unusual when coming up, as the prevailing wind is the north, which blows directly down the coast; whence the northern are called the windward, and the southern the leeward ports.

    Chapter X. A South-Easter-Passage up the Coast

  • This, however, settled the relative sailing of the vessels, for it was admitted that although she, being small and light, could gain upon us in very light winds, yet whenever there was breeze enough to set us agoing, we walked away from her like hauling in a line; and in beating to windward, which is the best trial of a vessel, we had much the advantage of her.

    Chapter XXIII. New Ship and Shipmates-My Watchmate

  • For the whole “eye” of the island, as natives call the windward end, lay desert.

    Island Nights' Entertainments

  • This, however, settled the relative sailing of the vessels, for it was admitted that although she, being small and light, could gain upon us in very light winds, yet whenever there was breeze enough to set us agoing, we walked away from her like hauling in a line; and in beating to windward, which is the best trial of a vessel, we had much the advantage of her.

    Two years before the mast, and twenty-four years after: a personal narrative

  • We had a fair wind, which is something unusual when coming up, as the prevailing wind is the north, which blows directly down the coast; whence the northern are called the windward, and the southern the leeward ports.

    Two years before the mast, and twenty-four years after: a personal narrative

  • We had a fair wind, which is something unusual when going up, as the prevailing wind is the north, which blows directly down the coast; whence the northern are called the windward, and the southern the leeward ports.

    Two Years Before the Mast

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