Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective being one more than twelve
  • noun the cardinal number that is the sum of twelve and one

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Prophet whose story is told in 1 Kings xiii, which is directly quoted in LA.

    The Latin & Irish Lives of Ciaran Translations Of Christian Literature. Series V. Lives Of The Celtic Saints

  • Father in heaven "(Ad Uxor., ii, 9); while elsewhere he speaks of the crown, the veil and the joining of hands (" De Corona "xiii," Do Virg.vel. ", ii).

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 9: Laprade-Mass Liturgy

  • Instead, in commercial hot spots of the Roman Forum and elsewhere, coins were handled in an argenteria, a stall whose name came from the word argentum, meaning at once “silver” and “money.”xiii Not sure whether my pouch of silver-looking coins is worth your three hundred jugs of olive oil?

    The English Is Coming!

  • In the mid-nineteenth century these word parts were assembled in Paris into bicycle.xiii Finally, in 1868, the word entered English, initially with the spelling “bysicle.”

    The English Is Coming!

  • Even in colonial America, Latin preserved its prestigious status as a distinctive language of the learned.xiii The Latinate character of SAT aptly, if tacitly, declared American English indebtedness to educational concepts forged in Latin.

    The English Is Coming!

  • This special prefix, m- or mu- in the singular, is associated with plant life and natural forces, such as fire and wind.xiii For example, the Swahili word for “tree” is mti.

    The English Is Coming!

  • Instead, in commercial hot spots of the Roman Forum and elsewhere, coins were handled in an argenteria, a stall whose name came from the word argentum, meaning at once “silver” and “money.”xiii Not sure whether my pouch of silver-looking coins is worth your three hundred jugs of olive oil?

    The English Is Coming!

  • Even in colonial America, Latin preserved its prestigious status as a distinctive language of the learned.xiii The Latinate character of SAT aptly, if tacitly, declared American English indebtedness to educational concepts forged in Latin.

    The English Is Coming!

  • This special prefix, m- or mu- in the singular, is associated with plant life and natural forces, such as fire and wind.xiii For example, the Swahili word for “tree” is mti.

    The English Is Coming!

  • In the mid-nineteenth century these word parts were assembled in Paris into bicycle.xiii Finally, in 1868, the word entered English, initially with the spelling “bysicle.”

    The English Is Coming!

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