Deyan has looked up 364 words, created 0 lists, listed 0 words, written 10 comments, added 0 tags, and loved 0 words.

Comments by Deyan

  • ✤✪✥✢❉❆✲❀✾✻✷✱✢✥❀✤✪✥✢❉❆✲❃❀✾✻✷✱✢✥❀✤✪✥✢❉✤✪✥✢❉❆✲❃❀✾✱✢✥

    _________Deyan__________________________________________________________

    May 6, 2011

  • I (have) cited only the relevant point like prepositions of place.
    The Saturday in "on Saturday" is not a place hence a surface.

    I may send screen shots to your Email if you would like.

    At is one-dimensional. We use it when we see something as a point in space.
    On is two-dimensional. We use it for a surface.
    In is three-dimensional. We use it when we see something as all around.
    Eastwood, John. Oxford Guide to English Grammar. p 291

    ___________Deyan________________________Regards_____________

    May 5, 2011

  • This criterion is not a matter of my whim, but of convention.

    No, I wouldn't. Everything is fine as it is.

    Eastwood, John. Oxford Guide to English Grammar. p 291

    I am a neophyte here on Wordnik, what is all this about?

    _____________Deyan________________________Regards______________________

    May 5, 2011

  • I appreciate the trouble that has been taken at last, blafferty; although I see only one material that can pass as a reference and no page numbers in the list. Some of the books are for kids, the others treat of extraneous matters which have nothing to do with English as a subject or speciality.

    Here are some of the cardinal rules:
    At is one-dimensional. We use it when we see something as a point in space or position at a point.
    On is two-dimensional. We use it for a surface.
    In is three-dimensional. We use it when we see something as all around.

    _____________Deyan_______________________Regards___________________

    May 5, 2011

  • Would it be misconstrued--as a rape 2nd degree probably, since I gather it's the mood-- if I ask at least two references of you in order for the agreement's justification not to be at odds? It is not about whether I am immovable or intransigent for no reason, but it's rather about the immovable facts of which I am well cognisant and took the trouble to apprise you of. And after all, along with a modicum of non-jejune interplay with my replies, I am pointed at as the one who is trying to abuse you... to abuse you with facts‽

    It sounds like gauche instigation on your part, blafferty.

    __________Deyan________________________________________________

    May 4, 2011

  • Yes, it will, as the Google reflects indiscriminatingly everything that there is to be found. Likewise, apropos, you may type "suggest me to" in W♥rdnik and see how unreliable it is when it comes to examples' quality and such. Many also say and write"on the law books" instead of "in the law books", and both can be found in either searches.
    To further my point I have drawn some relevant examples from reference books:


    "At the end of one letter were a number of dots which he..." p 410 A Dictionary of Modern English Usage-- H.W. Fowler

    "An affix (see above) at the end of a word or stem to make a derivative, as -cy, -ship..." p 622 A Dictionary of Modern English Usage-- H. W. Fowler

    "...are voiceless at the end of a word." p 32 The Grammar of Words-- Geert Booij (OXFORD TEXTBOOK IN LINGUISTICS)

    "At the end of the derivation we have computed..." p 157 The Grammar of Words-- Geert Booij (OXFORD TEXTBOOK IN LINGUISTICS)

    "... inflectional -s at the end of makes indicates..." p 44
    The Oxford English Grammar

    "Though having the plural inflection at the end, these..." p 105 The Oxford English Grammar

    "Usually they are attached at the end as enclitics: she's..." p 399 The Oxford English Grammar

    _______Deyan_____________________________________Regards

    Sionnach, I promise you, you will make a fool of yourself and find your master as soon as you are specific; apropos of which I pray thee be so.

    May 4, 2011

  • I am sorry, blafferty. In no way do I regard "on" as the proper preposition in this case. I shall take the liberty to assume that you either tend to rely on literalism in the choice of prepositions, or you simply labour under misconceptions at times. But, I assure you that we can properly use "at" after "add's" object, as in "Occasionally, we can hear some people add " 's" at the end of the word". In that example I shall say it is a thought wiser to interchange the prep. "to" that "add" conventionally takes, with "at" since it conveys a better sense of joining the genitive morpheme to the word. But taking "on" in here would make my hair stand on end; it would even do so in "Obama had an 's on the end." It's not a surface! In the end, I would like to say I have never read in any reputable or reference book the use you aver. I can adduce examples in favour of my contention.
    (The English used the U.S.A is defiled beyond believe).
    Regards

    May 3, 2011

  • " 'S" as a genitive affix added to the end of the proper noun in question , blafferty, is a solecism unless you mean not to put a full stop to the expression. As for example: ❝...in an address of President Obama's secretary (or competence), etc.❞, ("competence" here refers to the content of the address which someone else than the President might have delivered). Are you sure you have chosen the right preposision in the phrase "on the end"? If you are, would you explain it to me why?

    My suggestion anent "in an address of" is logically possible, but in this way "an" is logically preferable to be omitted.
    "I never speak in address of people in absentia".

    May 3, 2011

  • Hi bilby and all!!
    Type "in an address of" in W♥rdnik search bar and see for yourself. "In an address of" does not seem to mean "in an adversion to" but rather "addressing, in/with/having regard to, etc." For example: "Many such claims were already made in an address of bilby". How do you think?

    May 2, 2011

  • In an address of = concerning, aimed at, with/in reference to

    In an address to = In a speech addressing (someone)

    May 1, 2011

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