Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • This be the castle and the rock of Adamant, which is truly a trap to catch honest sailors.

    Huon of the Horn

  • The Adamant was the only vessel which it had been possible to send out in so short a time, and her cruise was somewhat of an experiment.

    The Great War Syndicate

  • She was an old fifty-gun ship, called the Adamant, if I recollect right.

    Jacob Faithful

  • The commander of the "Adamant" had no doubt that in this way he could run into a crab, roll it over in the water, and when it was lying bottom upward, like a floating cask, he could move his ship to a distance, and make a target of it.

    The Great War Syndicate

  • But signals from the repeller commanded them to stay by the "Adamant" as long as they could hold out, and they were obliged to content themselves with a hope that when night fell the other crab would be able to get in under the stern of the "Adamant," and make the desired exchange.

    The Great War Syndicate

  • The cannon which had been suspended from the end of this boom fell into the sea, and would have crashed down upon the roof of Crab K, had not that vessel, in obedience to a signal from the repeller, loosened its hold upon the "Adamant" and retired a short distance astern.

    The Great War Syndicate

  • Even if there had been on board the "Adamant" the means for rigging up another arrangement of the kind for perpendicular artillery practice, it would have required a long time to get it into working order, and the director of Repeller No. 7 hoped that now the British captain would see the uselessness of continued resistance.

    The Great War Syndicate

  • The calculations of the distance, of the necessary elevation and direction, and of the degree of motor-power required, were made with careful exactness, and when the proper instant arrived the button was touched, and the shot with which the cannon was charged was instantaneously removed to a point in the ocean about a mile beyond the "Adamant," accompanied by a large portion of the heavy boom at which the gun had been aimed.

    The Great War Syndicate

  • A vessel was sent down the coast by the Syndicate to notify Crab C of what had occurred, and to order it to tow the "Adamant" to the Bermudas, and there deliver her to the British authorities.

    The Great War Syndicate

  • All that day the great guns of the "Adamant" continued to roar.

    The Great War Syndicate

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  • Adamant is the last word in the last line of Emily Dickenson's poem "Twas warm - at first - like Us" and it is used as a noun.

    July 26, 2009