Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Very dark or gloomy.
  • n. Greek Mythology One of a mythical people described by Homer as inhabiting a land of perpetual darkness.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Any of the mythical people supposed to inhabit a land of perpetual darkness.
  • n. one of the Cimmerii, ancient equestrian nomads of Indo-European origin
  • n. the prophetic priestess presiding over the Apollonian Oracle at Cimmerium in Italy.
  • adj. Pertaining to the ancient Cimmerians.
  • adj. Characteristic of Cimmeria; especially describing particularly dense darkness etc.
  • proper n. the language of the Cimmerians, possibly belonging to the Iranian branch

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Pertaining to the Cimmerii, a fabulous people, said to have lived, in very ancient times, in profound and perpetual darkness.
  • adj. Without any light; intensely dark.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Pertaining to the Cimmerii, a mythical people mentioned by Homer as dwelling “beyond the ocean-stream, where the sun never shines, and perpetual darkness reigns.”
  • Hence Very dark; obscure; gloomy.
  • Pertaining to the Cimmerii, a nomadic people of antiquity dwelling in the Crimea, near the sea of Azof, and in the country of the lower Volga, and perhaps, from some vague knowledge, the original of the mythical Cimmerii.
  • n. One of the Cimmerii, in either the mythical or the historical application of that name.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. intensely dark and gloomy as with perpetual darkness

Etymologies

From Latin Cimmeriī, the Cimmerians, from Greek Kimmerioi.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From the Latin Cimmerius, from Ancient Greek Κιμμέριος ("pertaining to the Cimmerii") +‎ -an. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011