Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Of or relating to a temperature scale that registers the freezing point of water as 32° and the boiling point as 212° at one atmosphere of pressure. See Table at measurement.
  • Fahrenheit, Gabriel Daniel 1686-1736. German-born physicist who invented the mercury thermometer (1714) and devised the Fahrenheit temperature scale.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Describing a temperature scale originally defined as having 0 °F as the lowest temperature obtainable with a mixture of ice and salt, and 96 °F as the temperature of the human body, and now defined with 32 °F equal to 0 °C, and each degree Fahrenheit equal to 5/9 of a degree Celsius or 5/9 kelvin.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Conforming to the scale used by Gabriel Daniel Fahrenheit in the graduation of his thermometer; of or relating to Fahrenheit's thermometric scale. Used as an alternative to celsius.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • The name distinguishing the kind of thermometer-scale in most common use in Great Britain and the United States, in which the space between the freezing- and the boiling-point of water, under the standard pressure of the atmosphere, is divided into 180°, the freezing-point being marked 32°, and the boiling-point 212°: as, a temperature of 60° Fahrenheit (that is, according to the Fahrenheit scale).

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. of or relating to a temperature scale proposed by the inventor of the mercury thermometer
  • n. German physicist who invented the mercury thermometer and developed the scale of temperature that bears his name (1686-1736)

Etymologies

After Gabriel Daniel Fahrenheit.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From the German scientist Gabriel Daniel Fahrenheit. (Wiktionary)

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