Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Galician, a citizen of Galicia.
  • proper n. The Galician language spoken in Galicia. Although this language sounds like a mixture of Spanish and Portuguese, it is an independent language that evolved directly from Latin.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • For a time, as I stood on the cairn, I almost imagined myself on the Gallegan hill; much the same scenery presented itself as there, and a sun equally fierce struck upon my head as that which assailed it on the Gallegan hill.

    Wild Wales : Its People, Language and Scenery

  • In some respects this Pen Santaidd, this holy headland, reminded me of Finisterrae, the Gallegan promontory which I had ascended some seventeen years before, whilst engaged in battling the Pope with the sword of the gospel in his favourite territory.

    Wild Wales : Its People, Language and Scenery

  • Tom Jenkins swears by Bala and abuses Llangollen, and calls its people drunkards, just as a Spaniard exalts his own village and vituperates the next and its inhabitants, whom, though he will not call them drunkards, unless indeed he happens to be a Gallegan, he will not hesitate to term “una caterva de pillos y embusteros.”

    Wild Wales : Its People, Language and Scenery

  • I could never write a Gallegan or a Catalan novel.

    Youth and Egolatry

  • He engaged a Gallegan (Jose Calzado, whom he called Pepe) as salesman, and on 27th November formally opened his new premises.

    The Life of George Borrow

  • Certainly in the whole world there is no bolder coast than the Gallegan shore.

    The World's Greatest Books — Volume 19 — Travel and Adventure

  • Finisterra, the Gallegan promontory which I had ascended some seventeen years before.

    The World's Greatest Books — Volume 19 — Travel and Adventure

  • This I promised, at the same time determining to do my best to guard against the contingency, as sleeping in the loft of a Gallegan hut, though preferable to passing the night on

    George Borrow The Man and His Books

  • At its head were the captain-general and the Swiss, brandishing in his hand the magic rattan; close behind walked the _meiga_, the Gallegan witch-wife, by whom the treasure-seeker had been originally guided in the search; numerous masons brought up the rear, bearing implements to break up the ground.

    George Borrow The Man and His Books

  • Certainly in the whole world there is no bolder coast than the Gallegan shore, from the _debouchement_ of the Minho to Cape

    George Borrow The Man and His Books

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