Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. the Celtic language indigenous to Ireland, commonly called Irish.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the Celtic language of Ireland

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • If the Pictish language about which little is known contained a sizeable component of Irish Gaelic, Irish names may have fitted readily into Pictish culture.

    Archive 2010-01-01

  • So the question for me is, how do I convert names like: Bodicca, Barita, Catimandua, Cunovinda, Huctia, Tanconx, Vertissa and Verica into something that sounds less latinised and more like that sort of northern dialect that eventually merged with Irish Gaelic to give us medievil Scots Gaelic Women's names.

    Pictish female names

  • On the other hand, however, the example of Irish Gaelic has been less successful.

    Foreign terms as convenient euphemisms

  • Cruithne is an Irish Gaelic word, corresponding to the Brittonic word Pritani, which in turn gives the name of the island, Britain Laing and Laing 2001.

    The Picts (or Cruithne, or Albans): What's in a name?

  • Yet JRR Tolkien wasn't crazy about French, but loved the musical quality of Welsh but not Irish Gaelic, and once wrote to his son that simply hearing a list of words of the Old Gothic language pronounced aloud could "move him to tears".

    languagehat.com: CACOPHONY?

  • As I remember, Nuuchahnulth is the language that has around 30 lexical terms relating to salmon in much the same way that Eskimo Inuit has an almost equal number related to "snow" and Irish Gaelic for types of rain and rainfall.

    languagehat.com: NOOTKA DICTIONARY.

  • Below are many, though not all, of the terms that Irish Gaelic has for describing rainfall.

    languagehat.com: NOOTKA DICTIONARY.

  • As showing that the Scottish and Irish Gaelic were practically the same, as distinguished from the Celtic tongue spoken by the Welsh and Bretons,

    The Life Story of an Old Rebel

  • Linguistically speaking, the “Celts” of to-day (Irish Gaelic, Manx, Scotch Gaelic, Welsh, Breton) are Celtic and most of the Germans of to-day are Germanic precisely as the American Negro, Americanized Jew, Minnesota Swede, and German-American are “English.

    Chapter 10. Language, Race and Culture

  • As showing that the Scottish and Irish Gaelic were practically the same, as distinguished from the Celtic tongue spoken by the Welsh and Bretons, Bishop MacDonald told me he could read quite easily a book printed in the Irish characters.

    The Life Story of an Old Rebel

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.