Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Obsequious waiters instantly swarm the scene, putting up room dividers, dragging away corpses and apologizing profusely to diners for the disturbance.

    The Fiddler in the Subway

  • He is putting me in mind of a type of client that Irving Yalom describes in his group therapy text: “Obsequious and carefully avoiding any sign of aggressivity, they are often masochistic, rushing into self-flagellation before anyone else can pummel them.”

    THE HUSBANDS AND WIVES CLUB

  • Obsequious and servile demeanor should be saved for one's spouse, where it can do some good.

    On Thursday, the Legg report will be published along with...

  • Obsequious to his boss -- he wouldn't sit down with Stambolic until told to do so -- he was tough on underlings.

    The Balkans Bully, Few Friends

  • Obsequious grooms came running to take their reins.

    Knife of Dreams

  • Obsequious waiters took his dressing – bag and overcoat, the landlord himself welcomed him at the door.

    For the term of his natural life

  • Obsequious to the last moment, the jackal makes haste to fill his belly from the ribs of his late lion almost before he is cold.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 06, No. 35, September, 1860

  • Obsequious porters grasped his pig-skin bag, and seized Honora's; the man at the gate inclined his head as he examined their tickets, and the Pullman conductor himself showed them their stateroom, and plainly regarded them as important people far from home.

    A Modern Chronicle — Complete

  • Obsequious clerks and sailing masters are hanging about him for his orders; it is easy to see that he is a

    A Day in Old Athens; a Picture of Athenian Life

  • Obsequious officials returned to the use of the old Imperial phraseology and Yuan Shih-kai, even before his "election," was memorialized as though he were the legitimate successor of the immense line of Chinese sovereigns who stretch back to the mythical days of Yao and Shun (2,800 B.C.).

    The Fight for the Republic in China

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  • I found this in the Reader's Handbook on page 299.

    October 4, 2010