Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Prolépsis, or Anticipation, is the introduction of an epithet in advance of the action which makes it appropriate; as, -- submersās obrue puppēs, lit. _overwhelm their submerged ships_, i.e. overwhelm and sink their ships.a. The name Prolepsis is also applied to the introduction of a noun or pronoun as object of the main clause where we should expect it to stand as subject of a subordinate clause.

    New Latin Grammar

  • Ed. [340] Prolepsis is the figure which anticipates in the discourse something still future; as when the word Bethel is used to designate the place which at the time was called Luz, and which did not receive this name till it was given by Jacob.

    Commentary on Genesis - Volume 1

  • Linnæus, 'Prolepsis,' § 9, mentions some flowers of _Carduus heterophyllus_ and _C. tataricus_ in which the style had grown into two green leaflets, and in which the calyx and corolla were also leaf-like.

    Vegetable Teratology An Account of the Principal Deviations from the Usual Construction of Plants

  • [Sidenote: Prolepsis.] _Presumpcio_, a takynge before, or generall speakynge of those thynges whych afterwardes be declared more perticulerlye: as, in the meane seasõ that kyng Henry rode royally to Calais on

    A Treatise of Schemes and Tropes

  • Both varieties of Prolepsis are chiefly confined to poetry.

    New Latin Grammar

  • Ye haue yet another maner of speach purporting at the first blush a defect which afterward is supplied the, Greekes call him _Prolepsis_, we the

    The Arte of English Poesie

  • Ye haue yet another maner of speach purporting at the first blush a defect which afterward is supplied the, the Greekes call him Prolepsis, we the Propounder, or the Explaner which ye will: because he workes both effectes, as thus, where in certaine verses we describe the triumphant enter-view of two great Princesses thus.

    The Arte of English Poesie

  • Studies in Medievalism, 2000), Prolepsis: The Tübingen Review of English Studies (posted 9 Nov. 2001) available at ; and Prolepsis: The Heidelberg Review of English Studies (posted 9 Nov. 2001) available at ).

    Archive 2009-04-01

  • * Prolepsis: a “false description of an event before the event has taken place… the anticipation of your opponent’s argument.”

    The Last Empress

  • I know it will be said, continued my father (availing himself of the Prolepsis), that in itself, and simply taken — like hunger, or thirst, or sleep — ’tis an affair neither good or bad — or shameful or otherwise. —

    The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

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