Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • MountWrangell A peak, 4,319.7 m (14,163 ft) high, of the central Wrangell Mountains in southern Alaska.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Photographed above two weeks ago, puffy green aurora help the Moon illuminate the serene Willow Lake and the snowy Wrangell and Saint Elias Mountains in eastern Alaska ...

    Stunning image: Aurora over Alaska

  • Now there are fifty-eight, the largest being the 13.2-million-acre Wrangell–St. Elias National Park and Preserve in Alaska.

    Long May You Run

  • I'm sitting here, looking out the window of my cabin in Wrangell, Alaska, wishing that you were here with me, talking about such over a cup of coffee.

    Like Peas in a Pod

  • Wow -- you have potential House and senate Dem leadership/chairmanships with the likes of Nancy Pelosi, Ted Kennedy, Charley Wrangell and screamin 'Howie Dean running things behind the scenes; and SHE'S calling republican leadership a FREAK SHOW?

    Sound Politics: Republicans Picking Up Steam As Election Day Nears

  • This painting of Mt. Kimball in the Wrangell Mountains is one of the few works of Alaska by Johnson that are known to have survived.

    Albloggerque

  • Included are the first four monuments, plus six from Chaco Canyon (1907) to Wrangell-St.

    Antiquities Act Centennial

  • Late on the third day the steamer made a stop at Fort Wrangell.

    The Long Trail

  • All that section of Alaska, from smoking Wrangell to the Pacific coast, shows volcanic peaks.

    The Call of the Beaver Patrol or, A Break in the Glacier

  • In 1867 Captain Long, in traversing that part of the sea navigated by Wrangell, discovered a large tract of land which the Russian explorer had vainly endeavored to reach, and which he named Wrangell Land.

    Harper's Young People, February 17, 1880 An Illustrated Weekly

  • MAMIE E.F. F.rdinand Wrangell, a Russian baron and traveller, who was born near the close of the last century, and died in 1870, commanded a sledge expedition which explored the polar sea north of East Siberia about

    Harper's Young People, February 17, 1880 An Illustrated Weekly

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