above the fold love

Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Situated in the upper half of the front page of a broadsheet newspaper, and thus more prominent, as the lower half is not usually visible when the folded newspaper is displayed for sale.
  • adj. By extension, situated near the top of a web page; not requiring scrolling. See above the scroll.
  • adj. Anything similarly occupying an exclusive position of relative prominence

Etymologies

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Examples

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Comments

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  • 'Hitlery Channel', that's hysterical. Reesetee, you should wordie that!

    September 10, 2007

  • Er...I used paste, seanahan. Rilly. I mean actual glue.

    Yep, those were the days.

    John, do you really think we've come that far in this discussion? Maybe you've been watching the Hitlery Channel too much. ;-)

    September 9, 2007

  • Ah, un*x. I just got out-geeked! It's only a matter of time before someone says we should properly be talking about 'yank', and from there it's a slippery slope until we're calling each other Nazis :-)

    Uh, it feels inappropriate to be following the word Nazi with a smiley.

    September 9, 2007

  • I always associate cut and paste with highlight and middle click. I understand the use of cut, but who ever actually used paste?

    September 9, 2007

  • You're right, I so associate cut and paste with ctrl-c and -v that I forget they're something you can do to paper.

    In the early nineties some friends and I did a 'zine, and we had one issue printed with offset lithography (the rest were xeroxed). We had to make a proper pasteup for the printer, and it felt archaic even then.

    September 9, 2007

  • Why, it's always at the bottom of the top of the page, silly! Rilly!

    September 9, 2007

  • It's interesting how many of these older print terms have been picked up for computer use--even back to "cutting" and "pasting" in word processing documents. Who actually cuts and pastes anymore? And where's the fold on a web page? ;-)

    September 9, 2007

  • Newspaper speak for stories that appear on the top half of the front page (or the front of a section), so that they're visible when the paper is folded. Webspeak for content that's visible on a web page without having to scroll.

    September 9, 2007