Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Of, relating to, or being the grammatical case that is the direct object of a verb or the object of certain prepositions.
  • adj. Accusatory.
  • n. The accusative case.
  • n. A word or form in the accusative case.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Producing accusations; accusatory; accusatorial; a manner that reflects a finding of fault or blame
  • adj. Applied to the case (as the fourth case of Latin, Lithuanian and Greek nouns) which expresses the immediate object on which the action or influence of a transitive verb has its limited influence. Other parts of speech, including secondary or predicate direct objects, will also influence a sentence’s construction. In German the case used for direct objects.
  • n. The accusative case.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Producing accusations; accusatory.
  • adj. Applied to the case (as the fourth case of Latin and Greek nouns) which expresses the immediate object on which the action or influence of a transitive verb terminates, or the immediate object of motion or tendency to, expressed by a preposition. It corresponds to the objective case in English.
  • n. The accusative case.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Producing accusations; accusatory.
  • In grammar, noting especially the direct object of a verb, and to a considerable extent (and probably primarily) destination or goal of motion: applied to a case forming part of the original Indo-European declension (as of the case-systems of other languages), and retained as a distinct form by the older languages of the family, and by some of the modern.
  • n. Short for accusative case. See I., 2.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. containing or expressing accusation
  • n. the case of nouns serving as the direct object of a verb
  • adj. serving as or indicating the object of a verb or of certain prepositions and used for certain other purposes

Etymologies

Middle English acusatif, from Old French, from Latin (cāsus) accūsātīvus, (case) of accusation (mistranslation of Greek aitiātikē (ptōsis), causal (case), (case) indicating the thing caused by the verb, from aitiā, cause, also accusation, charge), from accūsātus, past participle of accūsāre, to accuse; see accuse.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

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