Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. One of the small pedestals, for statues or other ornaments, placed on the apex and at the basal angles of a pediment, or upon the gables in Gothic architecture.
  • n. One of the pedestals, for vases or statues, forming a part roof balustrade.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One of the small pedestals, for statues or other ornaments, placed on the apex and at the basal angles of a pediment. Acroteria are also sometimes placed upon the gables in Gothic architecture.
  • n. One of the pedestals, for vases or statues, forming a part roof balustrade.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In classic arch., a small pedestal placed on the apex or angle of a pediment for the support of a statue or other ornament.
  • n. A statue or an ornament placed on such a pedestal.
  • n. Any ornament forming the apex of a building or other structure, or of a monument, such as the anthemia of Greek tombstones or the decorations of some modern architectural balustrades. Compare antefix. Also called acroter.

Etymologies

Latin, from Ancient Greek; related to ἄκρος (akros, "highest, at the extremity"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The gables are each crowned with a figure of Victory, sometimes called an "acroterium," from the architectural name of the tablet on which it stands.

    The Jewel City

  • An ever present feature, also, is the palmette acroterium, treated in conventional ceramic style.

    The American Journal of Archaeology, 1893-1

  • Fortunately a notable example has been preserved in the acroterium of the gable of the

    The American Journal of Archaeology, 1893-1

  • In the great acroterium of the Heraion, for example, the surface was first covered with a dark varnish-like coating on which the drawing was incised down to the original clay.

    The American Journal of Archaeology, 1893-1

  • Mr. Failing, who was sitting alone in the garden too ill to read, heard a shout, "Am I an acroterium?"

    The Longest Journey

  • Calpurnia had, but the following: there was attached to Cæsar's house by way of ornament and distinction pursuant to a vote of the Senate an acroterium, [603] as Livius says, and Calpurnia in her dream seeing this tumbling down lamented and wept.

    Plutarch's Lives Volume III.

  • The columns are surmounted by their entablature and a pediment, behind which a low attic rises from the roof of the church to the height of the apex of the pediment; it is crowned with a cornice and blocking-course, and surmounted by an acroterium of nearly its own height, but in breadth only equalling two-thirds of it; this is finished with a sub-cornice and blocking-course, and is surmounted by the tower, which rises from the middle.

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 13, No. 386, August 22, 1829

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