Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A court exercising jurisdiction over all maritime cases.
  • n. Maritime law.
  • n. The department of the British government that once had control over all naval affairs.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The office or jurisdiction of an admiral.
  • n. The department or officers having authority over naval affairs generally.
  • n. The court which has jurisdiction of maritime questions and offenses.
  • n. The system of jurisprudence of admiralty courts.
  • n. The building in which the lords of the admiralty, in England, transact business.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The office or jurisdiction of an admiral.
  • n. The department or officers having authority over naval affairs generally.
  • n. The court which has jurisdiction of maritime questions and offenses.
  • n. The system of jurisprudence of admiralty courts.
  • n. The building in which the lords of the admiralty, in England, transact business.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In Great Britain: The office and jurisdiction of the lords commissioners appointed to take the general management of maritime affairs, and of all matters relating to the royal navy, with the government of its various departments.
  • n. The body of officers appointed to execute the office of lord high admiral; a board of commissioners, called lords (or, in full, lords commissioners) of the admiralty, for the administration of naval affairs.
  • n. The building in which the lords of the admiralty transact business, and in which the clerks and other officials connected with this department are employed.
  • n. That branch of law which deals with maritime cases and offenses.
  • n.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the department in charge of the navy (as in Great Britain)
  • n. the office of admiral

Etymologies

From French amirauté, for an older amiralté ("office of admiral"), from Late Latin admiralitas. See admiral (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Last Thursday's term was uberrimae fidei, a common term in admiralty law, which is defined as:

    Legal Definitions

  • Upon arrest of the vessel in admiralty in the Middle District of Florida, Tampa Division federal court, a willful, material, admitted, and confessed perjurer, Theron Hutto, was brought forth to falsely testify and masquerdae as an Ocean Unlimited Master who could captain any ship of the United States fleet on any seas.

    Balkinization

  • When Willoughby called the admiralty court on June 17, 1665, the factors cited the company's royal charter which justified the seizure of interlopers.

    The Journal of Negro History, Volume 4, 1919

  • Oh, and the gold fringe on the flag in the courtroom makes it a flag of admiralty, meaning the court has no jurisdiction over them.

    Confederate Yankee

  • A major figure in Mr. Brandt's book is John Barrow, an English secretary of the admiralty, who persuaded his government to fund many expeditions based on false assumptions and nationalistic hubris.

    Thrilling Adventure Tales

  • He had been a renowned yachtsman and had worked at high levels at the admiralty in Washington DC.

    Lea Lane: What I Learned from Meeting a Man Who Met Albert Einstein

  • The next \expndtw1 day when he was out on the croft, I looked in his cottage. \expndtw3 There was an admiralty map of the area and there was a \expndtw2 circle around the entrance to Loch Drim.

    Poem About Never Growing Up

  • Are you the lawyer Peter Hess who specializes in representing “salvors” in admiralty court, and taking a cut in the process?

    Why I Oppose Commercializing Underwater Wrecks

  • This saga is still playing out as Barnett and Lerner, an admiralty law firm in Florida, is taking ExxonMobil to court to pay for disabilities, medicine, health care, and lost wages of those who survived the failed 1989 cleanup.

    Riki Ott: Beware the Sirens of Big Oil

  • In that same year, she and her brother Ferdinand opened their own law office in New York called Bullowa and Bullowa, specializing in admiralty law.

    Emilie M. Bullowa.

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