Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A kind of adoption in Ancient Rome.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A kind of adoption in ancient Rome. See arrogation.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A kind of adoption in ancient Rome, by which a person legally capable of choosing for himself was admitted into the relation of son to another by a vote of the people in the Comitia Curiata, or in later times by a rescript of the emperor: so called from the questions put to the parties. Also written arrogation.

Etymologies

Latin adrogatio, arrogatio, from adrogare. See arrogate. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The first is the mode in which we adopt independent persons, and this form of adoption is called adrogation: the second is the mode in which we adopt a person subject to the power of an ascendant, whether a descendant in the first degree, as a son or daughter, or in a remoter degree, as a grandson, granddaughter, great-grandson, or great-granddaughter.

    The Institutes of Justinian

  • Another means for the acquisition of ownership was adrogation, whereby a person sui juris was adopted into the paternal power of another.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 9: Laprade-Mass Liturgy

  • Similar to adoption was adrogation, whereby one sui juris subjected himself to the patria potestas of another.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 9: Laprade-Mass Liturgy

  • If you become the successors, civil or praetorian, of a person deceased, or adopt an independent person by adrogation, or become assignees of a deceased's estate in order to secure their liberty to slaves manumitted by his will, the whole estate of those persons is transferred to you in an aggregate mass.

    The Institutes of Justinian

  • We have, however, by our constitution excepted persons adopted by natural ascendants, for between them and their adopters there is the natural tie of blood as well as the civil tie of adoption, and therefore in this case we have preserved the older law, as also in that of an independent person giving himself in adrogation: all of which enactment can be gathered in its special details from the tenor of the aforesaid constitution.

    The Institutes of Justinian

  • The adrogation is also made under certain conditions; that is to say, the adrogator has to give security to a public agent or attorney of the people, that if the pupil should die within the age of puberty, he will return his property to the persons who would have succeeded him had no adoption taken place.

    The Institutes of Justinian

  • 1 When an independent person gives himself in adrogation, all his property, corporeal and incorporeal, and all debts due to him formerly passed in full ownership to the adrogator, except such rights as are extinguished by loss of status, for instance, bounden services of freedmen and rights of agnation.

    The Institutes of Justinian

  • 1 Again, tutelage is terminated by adrogation or deportation of the pupil before he attains the age of puberty, or by his being reduced to slavery or taken captive by the enemy.

    The Institutes of Justinian

  • 3 The least loss of status occurs when citizenship and freedom are retained, but a man's domestic position is altered, and is exemplified by adrogation and emancipation.

    The Institutes of Justinian

  • 2 But we have now confined acquisition by adrogation within the same limits as acquisition through their children by natural parents; that is to say, adoptive as well as natural parents acquire no greater right in property which comes to children in their power from any extraneous source than a mere usufruct; the ownership is vested in the children themselves.

    The Institutes of Justinian

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.