Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A trisyllabic metrical foot having an unaccented or short syllable between two accented or long syllables, as in Peter Pan. Also called cretic.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A metrical foot consisting of an unaccented syllable between two accented syllables; a cretic

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A foot of three syllables, the middle one short and the others long, as in cāst�tās.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In prosody, a foot of three syllables, the middle one short and the others long, as in Latin cāstĭtās: the opposite of amphibrach.

Etymologies

Latin amphimacrus, from Greek amphimakros : amphi-, amphi- + makros, long; see māk- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • But perchance if ye would seeme yet more curious, in place of these four _Trocheus_ ye might induce other feete of three times, as to make the three sillables next following the _dactil_, the foote [_amphimacer_] the last word [_Sepulcher_] the foote [_amphibracus_] leauing the other midle word for a [_Iambus_] thus.

    The Arte of English Poesie

  • Four groups, each practically uttered as one word: the first, in this case, an iamb; the second, an amphibrachys; the third, a trochee; and the fourth, an amphimacer; and yet our schoolboy, with no other liberty but that of inflicting pain, had triumphantly scanned it as five iambs.

    Essays in the Art of Writing

  • The amphimacer may, in English, be substituted for the dactyl, occasionally.

    Reminiscences of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Robert Southey

  • The tribrachus all his three parts swiftly: the antibacchius his two first partes slowly, his last & third swiftly: the amphimacer, his first & last part slowly & his middle part swiftly: the amphibracus his first and last parts swiftly but his midle part slowly, & so of others by like proportion.

    The Arte of English Poesie

  • But perchance if ye would seeme yet more curious, in place of these foure Trocheus ye might induce other feete of three times, as to make the three sillables next following the dactil, the foote [amphimacer] the last word [Sepulcher] the foote [amphibracus] leauing the other midle word for a [Iambus] thus.

    The Arte of English Poesie

  • I'd like to see a rigorous test, in which the applicant has to demonstrate full mastery of alliteration and assonance, imagery and metonymy, amphibrach and amphimacer, rondeau and pantoum, triolet and villanelle.

    The Corner on National Review Online

  • [_fo-rsa-ke ` n_] [_i-mpu-gne ` d_] and others many: For your _amphimacer_ that is a long, a short and a long ye haue these words and many more

    The Arte of English Poesie

  • _amphimacer_, his first & last part slowly & his middle part swiftly: the

    The Arte of English Poesie

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