Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of or pertaining to an anchorite

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. etc. See anchoretic, etc.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. characterized by ascetic solitude

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Across the Channel in England, at roughly the same time, Aelred, the Cistercian abbot of Rievaulx, composed a Rule for recluses intended for his sister and the small group of companions who had joined her in the anchoritic life.

    Sensual Encounters: Monastic Women and Spirituality in Medieval Germany

  • Or refuge wherein a handful of carnivore outcasts had lived, nearly anchoritic.

    Cold Mountain

  • And candor compels the admission forthwith that the presence of this anchoritic merit in the wilderness is hardly due to me.

    The Jewel Merchants A Comedy in One Act

  • Founder of anchoritic life in Palestine; born at Tabatha, south of

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 7: Gregory XII-Infallability

  • Hilarion was greatly honored as the founder of anchoritic life in

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 7: Gregory XII-Infallability

  • Age and hygienic necessities bind me to a somewhat anchoritic life in pure air, with abundant leisure to meditate upon the wisdom of Candide's sage aphorism, "Cultivons notre jardin" -- especially if the term garden may be taken broadly and applied to the stony and weed-grown ground within my skull, as well as to a few perches of more promising chalk down outside it.

    Life and Letters of Thomas Henry Huxley — Volume 3

  • The Venerable Bede speaks of as many as three personages, Saxons by their names, who in the Isle of Ireland led the "Pilgrim" or anchoritic life, to obtain a country in heaven; and tells of a

    The Hermits

  • The Venerable Bede speaks of as many as three personages, Saxons by their names, who in the Isle of Ireland led the “Pilgrim” or anchoritic life, to obtain a country in heaven; and tells of a Drycthelm of the monastery at Melrose, who went into a secret dwelling therein to give himself more utterly to prayer, and who used to stand for hours in the cold waters of the Tweed, as St. Godric did centuries afterwards in those of the Wear.

    The Hermits

  • Age and hygienic necessities bind me to a somewhat anchoritic life in pure air, with abundant leisure to meditate upon the wisdom of Candide's sage aphorism, "Cultivons notre jardin" ” especially if the term garden may be taken broadly and applied to the stony and weed-grown ground within my skull, as well as to a few perches of more promising chalk down outside it.

    The Life and Letters of Thomas Henry Huxley

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