Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Intended to counteract or eliminate environmental pollution: antipollution filters; antipollution laws.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Any way, shape, or form which directly or indirectly helps the environment or reduces pollution.
  • adj. Of, pertaining to, or having the characteristics of that which helps the environment or reduces pollution.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. intended to reduce pollution

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • We have also, as you know, advanced far in antipollution measures.

    Britain's Scientific and Industrial Achievements

  • Contemporary Marxists recognize that capital can produce "green" commodities such as antipollution devices, recycled goods, or organic produce, but capital will only do so if it can reproduce itself exponentially through these avenues.

    Neoclassical, institutional, and marxist approaches to the environment-economic relationship

  • Inspectors arrive offshore via government-leased helicopters usually with a computer-generated random list of safety and antipollution components.

    Inspectors Rarely Surprised Oil Rigs

  • They mean safety regulations, antipollution regulations, and other regulations that protect the earth and people on it.

    BP is active player in DC money game

  • In 2008, a federal court said the EPA's approach violated a requirement of federal law that power plants be outfitted with the best available antipollution technology.

    EPA Tangles With New Critic: Labor

  • Later, he led the development of the antipollution catalytic converter, which GM installed across its entire fleet in 1975, beating the rest of the car industry to comply with an environmental mandate.

    Engineer Ran GM in Dark Early '90s

  • The notice cited Chesapeake for violating antipollution laws and asked the company to explain "why it took Chesapeake nearly 12 hours to address the uncontrolled release of fluids off the well pad" and why it took 12 hours to get a well-control company to the site "when there are other well control service companies located closer."

    Chesapeake Spill Heightens Pressures

  • The history of antipollution programs shows that it is always cheaper to prevent emissions than to reverse any damage they cause.

    Global Warming: Who Loses—and Who Wins?

  • For example, a global firm operating in a pollution-producing sector might choose clean technology in a developing country where antipollution rules or enforcement are inadequate.

    Creative Capitalism

  • To the extent it reduced global trade, carbon protectionism would slow the rise in income that we know from the last half century has been crucial to antipollution progress.

    Resisting Green Tariffs

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