Definitions

Sorry, no definitions found.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Wadi Al-Hitan is the only place in the world where numerous archaeocete skeletons can be seen in place in their original geological and geographic setting.

    Wadi Al-Hitan (Whale Valley), Egypt

  • The intermediacy of the archaeocete whales of Wadi Al-Hitan is corroborated by skeletal features like the retention of well-formed hind limbs, feet, and toes in Basilosaurus and in Dorudon.

    Wadi Al-Hitan (Whale Valley), Egypt

  • Older and more primitive archaeocete whales come primarily from India and Pakistan from forested foothills of the Himalaya, from desert areas in Kutch, and from desert in tribal parts of Punjab, the Northwest Frontier and Balochistan provinces that are inaccessible to most people.

    Wadi Al-Hitan (Whale Valley), Egypt

  • A substantial number of partial skeletons of archaeocete whales more or less contemporary with those of Wadi Al-Hitan have been found on the Atlantic and Gulf coastal plain of eastern North America over the past 150 years, but none of these skeletons are complete and the sites where they were found are scattered, covered by vegetation, and generally inaccessible.

    Wadi Al-Hitan (Whale Valley), Egypt

  • The largest was Basilosaurus isis, which was up to 21 m long, with well developed five-fingered flippers on the forelimbs and the quite unexpected presence of hind legs, feet, and toes, not known previously in any archaeocete; a vestigial use may have been as claspers during aquatic mating.

    Wadi Al-Hitan (Whale Valley), Egypt

  • Three of the whales are Basilosaurids, the latest surviving group of archaeocete whales which are the earliest, now extinct, sub-order of whales, ancestors of the modern Mysticeti and Odontoceti whale families.

    Wadi Al-Hitan (Whale Valley), Egypt

  • Remingtonocetus harudiensis, new combination, a Middle Eocene archaeocete (Mammalia, Cetacea) from western Kutch, India.

    Archive 2006-02-01

  • Pakicetus inachus, a new archaeocete (Mammalia, Cetacea) from the Early-Middle Eocen Kuldana Formation of Kohat (Pakistan).

    Archive 2006-02-01

  • Fossil evidence for the origin of aquatic locomotion in archaeocete whales.

    Archive 2006-02-01

  • Argentine paleontologist Marcelo Reguero, who led a joint Argentine-Swedish team, said the fossilized archaeocete jawbone found in February dates back 49 million years.

    The Seattle Times

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.