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Etymologies

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Examples

  • There were crisp husks of beechmast and cast acorn cups underfoot in the russet slime of dead bracken where the rains of the equinox had so soaked the earth that the cold oozed up through the soles of the shoes, lancinating cold of the approaching winter that grips hold of your belly and squeezed it tight.

    Openings

  • Saint Fiacre IN HORTO after the papal blessing the happy pair were subjected to a playful crossfire of hazelnuts, beechmast, bayleaves, catkins of willow, ivytod, hollyberries, mistletoe sprigs and quicken shoots.

    Ulysses

  • The fallen beechmast was cool and slippery under me, but a good many leaves still clung, yellowed and curling, to the tree above.

    Dragonfly in Amber

  • Well, they happen, the lightning-strokes of God, the gifted or misfortunates who are born into a world where they nowhere belong, the saints and scholars who come to manhood unrecognized, guarding the swine in the forest pastures among the beechmast, the warrior princes villein-born and youngest in a starving clan, set to scare the crows away from the furrow.

    The Virgin In The Ice

  • "Bacon, _of the Beechen tree_, anciently called BUCON; and, whereas swinesflesh is now called by the name of BACON, it grew only at the first unto such as were fatted with BUCON or _beechmast_."

    Notes and Queries, Number 64, January 18, 1851

  • Circe now drove them all together into a stye, and flung down beechmast, and acorns, and cornel berries, for them to eat.

    Stories from the Odyssey

  • Her hair was neither bronze nor gold nor copper, yet seemed to be an alloy of all the precious mines of the turning year – the vigorous dusky gold of November elms, the rust of dead bracken made living by heavy rains, the color of beechmast drenched with sunlight after frost, and all the layers of glory on the boughs before it fell, when it needed neither sun nor dew to make it glow.

    Martin Pippin in the Apple Orchard

  • Her hair was neither bronze nor gold nor copper, yet seemed to be an alloy of all the precious mines of the turning year – the vigorous dusky gold of November elms, the rust of dead bracken made living by heavy rains, the colour of beechmast drenched with sunlight after frost, and all the layers of glory on the boughs before it fell, when it needed neither sun nor dew to make it glow.

    Martin Pippin in the Apple Orchard

  • Her hair was neither bronze nor gold nor copper, yet seemed to be an alloy of all the precious mines of the turning year -- the vigorous dusky gold of November elms, the rust of dead bracken made living by heavy rains, the color of beechmast drenched with sunlight after frost, and all the layers of glory on the boughs before it fell, when it needed neither sun nor dew to make it glow.

    Martin Pippin in the Apple Orchard

  • THE VOICE OF VIRAG: _ (A birdchief, bluestreaked and feathered in war panoply with his assegai, striding through a crackling canebrake over beechmast and acorns) _ Hot!

    Ulysses

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  • "The fallen beechmast was cool and slippery under me, but a good many leaves still clung, yellowed and curling, to the tree above."
    —Diana Gabaldon, Dragonfly in Amber (NY: Delacorte Press, 1991), 545

    January 2, 2010