Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Having two heads or points of origin, as a muscle.
  • adj. Of or relating to a biceps.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of or pertaining to a biceps.
  • adj. Having two heads or points of origin.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj.
  • adj. Having two heads or origins, as a muscle.
  • adj. Pertaining to a biceps muscle.
  • adj. Dividing into two parts at one extremity; having two heads or two supports.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Having two heads; two-headed.
  • In anatomy: Having two heads or origins, as a muscle. See biceps, Pertaining to the biceps muscles.
  • In botany, dividing into two parts at the top or bottom. Also bicipitous.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. having two heads or points of origin as a biceps

Etymologies

From Latin biceps, bicipit-, two-headed; see biceps.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin biceps ("double-headed"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Short head: coracoid process of scapula with coracobrachialis INSERTION posterior border of bicipital tuberosity of radius over bursa and bicipital aponeurosis to deep fascia and subcutaneous ulna

    Archive 2009-01-01

  • In some instances lameness is mixed as in joint ailments, involvement of the bicipital bursa (bursa intertubercularis), etc. In affections of the extremity there exists supporting leg lameness.

    Lameness of the Horse Veterinary Practitioners' Series, No. 1

  • Chronic inflammation of the bicipital bursa is occasionally met with wherein both members are affected.

    Lameness of the Horse Veterinary Practitioners' Series, No. 1

  • -- Because of the exposed position of the bicipital bursa (bursa-intertubercularis) it is occasionally injured.

    Lameness of the Horse Veterinary Practitioners' Series, No. 1

  • It is to be noted that the tendon of the biceps brachii (flexor brachii) is always involved in cases of inflammation of the bicipital bursa, and according to the late Dr. Bell [8] strain of the biceps brachii is a frequent cause of lameness in city horses, more frequent than is generally supposed.

    Lameness of the Horse Veterinary Practitioners' Series, No. 1

  • On the bicipital border of the vein is seen the internal cutaneous nerve; on the tricipital border is the nerve of

    Surgical Anatomy

  • As it descends through the arm, it lies at first lateral to the brachial artery; about the level of the insertion of the Coracobrachialis it crosses the artery, usually in front of, but occasionally behind it, and lies on its medial side at the bend of the elbow, where it is situated behind the lacertus fibrosus (bicipital fascia), and is separated from the elbow-joint by the Brachialis.

    IX. Neurology. 6b. The Anterior Divisions

  • —The artery is superficial throughout its entire extent, being covered, in front, by the integument and the superficial and deep fasciæ; the lacertus fibrosus (bicipital fascia) lies in front of it opposite the elbow and separates it from the vena mediana cubiti; the median nerve crosses from its lateral to its medial side opposite the insertion of the Coracobrachialis.

    VI. The Arteries. 4b. 2. The Brachial Artery

  • Its lips are called, respectively, the crests of the greater and lesser tubercles (bicipital ridges), and form the upper parts of the anterior and medial borders of the body of the bone.

    II. Osteology. 6a. 3. The Humerus

  • The tubercles are separated from each other by a deep groove, the intertubercular groove (bicipital groove), which lodges the long tendon of the Biceps brachii and transmits a branch of the anterior humeral circumflex artery to the shoulder-joint.

    II. Osteology. 6a. 3. The Humerus

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