Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Any of an ancient French breed of sturdily built, rough-coated dogs.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An ancient French breed of sturdy, rough-coated dogs.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. an old French breed of large strong usually black dogs having a long tail and long wavy and slightly stiff coat.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. old French breed of large strong usually black dogs having a long tail and long wavy and slightly stiff coat

Etymologies

French, from Brie, a region of northern France.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
French briard (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • More Briard puppy updates at thecoughlin, under her briard puppies tag.

    "suicide contagion."

  • Boling lounged back in a deep armchair, joined by Raye the briard.

    Roadside Crosses

  • Delighting Wes and Maggie, they also brought with them a long-haired tawny puppy, a briard named Raye.

    Roadside Crosses

  • "Tell No One" - Give me a white-knuckle chase and a briard with a key role in a thriller any time.

    indieWIRE News

  • You not only get a dog, you get one who is typically “dignified, lordly, scowling, sober and snobbish” (shar-pei); “merry and affectionate” (English cocker spaniel); “reserved and discerning with strangers” (chow chow); with a “rollicking personality” (Irish setter); full of “self-importance” (Pekingese); having “heedless, reckless pluck” (Irish terrier); “equable” (Bouvier des Flandres); or, most surprisingly, “a dog at heart” (briard).

    INSIDE OF A DOG

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Comments

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  • Dog breed popularized after the Paris dog show of 1863, though Charlemagne is said to have owned several (?!). According to Simon & Schuster's Guide to Dogs, 1980.
    Also, just a damn fine word.

    February 21, 2007