Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Any of certain light cavalry or infantry troops trained for rapid maneuvers.
  • n. A hunter.
  • n. A uniformed footman.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A soldier equipped for rapid movement; also, any of several light infantry regiments, especially in France.
  • n. A servant or attendant.
  • n. A hotel messenger, especially in France.
  • n. A style of cooking in which meat is cooked with a sauce containing mushrooms, shallots and white wine

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One of a body of light troops, cavalry or infantry, trained for rapid movements.
  • n. An attendant upon persons of rank or wealth, wearing a plume and sword.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A huntsman.
  • n. A soldier.
  • n. A domestic in the households of persons of rank in Europe, who wears a huntsman's or a semi-military livery, and performs the duties of a footman.

Etymologies

French, from Old French chaceor, from chacier, to pursue; see chase1.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From French chasseur. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The chasseur was a tall, meagre, swarthy Spaniard or mulatto, lightly clad in cotton shirt and drawers, with broad straw-hat and moccasins of raw hide; his belt sustaining his long, straight, flat sword or _machete_, like an iron bar sharpened at one end; and he wore by the same belt three cotton leashes for his three dogs, sometimes held also by chains.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 05, No. 28, February, 1860

  • The chasseur was a tall, meagre, swarthy Spaniard or mulatto, lightly clad in cotton shirt and drawers, with broad straw hat, and moccasins of raw-hide; his belt sustaining his long, straight, flat sword or _machete_, like an iron bar sharpened at one end; and he wore by the same belt three cotton leashes for his three dogs, sometimes held also by chains.

    Black Rebellion Five Slave Revolts

  • a yard of him a Luxembourgeois whom he had known as his chasseur in a big hotel in Paris.

    The Soul of the War

  • In the evening, the menu takes on more of a bistro persona, with a la carte offerings spanning the gamut from burgers, roast chicken and baked fish to tasty "chasseur" hotpots of mussels steamed in wine (moules marinieres this would be called in France).

    News On Japan

  • "chasseur" style of oratory -- now skirmishing on the outskirts of an opponent's position, then rallying on some strange point, pouring in a rattling fire, standing firm against a charge, and ever displaying a perfect independence of action and a disregard of partisan drill.

    Perley's Reminiscences, v. 1-2 of Sixty Years in the National Metropolis

  • Three Random Words: un chasseur de têtes (m) = headhunter un ramasse-crottes (m) = pooper-scooper faisable (adj) = doable

    mauvais perdant - French Word-A-Day

  • La plume de l'écrivain est aux pensées ce que le filet du chasseur est aux papillons.

    Savoir Vivre

  • The president is the most famous person in Iraq to have a shoe hurled at him since the legion of Iraqis heaved their les chasseur at the fallen statue of deposed dictator Saddam Hussein.

    Byron Williams: I Wonder if the President Could See his Sole?

  • Davout had only 13 squadrons of horse, consisting of 7 squadrons of dragoons, 4 chasseur squadrons and 2 squadrons of lancers.

    In The Grand Manner - Day 2

  • This chasseur regiment has 20 more figures to add at some point - they are the new Elite Chasseurs.

    1806 Project Update

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