Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Obsolete spelling of cheer.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Revels and merriment after the old English custome; [they] prepared to sett up a Maypole upon the festivall day . . . and therefore brewed a barrell of excellent beare [beer] . . . to be spent, with other good cheare, for all commers of that day . . .

    A Renegade History of the United States

  • Fortune befalne him, advised him in such manner as they were wont to do; allowing it much better for him, to make merrie with the money in good cheare among them, then to lay it out in paltry Land, whereto he would not by any meanes listen, but ridde himselfe of them with a dinners cost, as loath to bee at anie further charge with them.

    The Decameron

  • Judge being married, and the Bride brought solemnly home to his house, we need make no question of brave cheare and banquetting, well furnished by their friends on either side: other matters were now hammering in the judges head, for thogh he could please all his

    The Decameron

  • Credulano calling for Wine and good cheare, feasted both the

    The Decameron

  • Albeit some light Novels, perhaps attractive to a little wantonnes, as some say, and our joviall feasting with good cheare, singing and dancing, may seeme matters inciting to incivility, especially in weake and shallow understandings.

    The Decameron

  • Salabetto could come see her whensoever he pleased, many occasions now happened, whereby he came seven times for once, and yet his entrance was scarsely admitted, neither was his entertainment so affable, or his cheare so bountifull, as in his former accesses thither.

    The Decameron

  • Sir Domine heere and we, will make good cheare with it among our selves.

    The Decameron

  • But Blondello perceived (to his cost) that hee had met with the worser bargaine, and Guiotto got cheare, without any blowes: and therefore desired a peacefull attonement, each of them (alwayes after) abstaining from flouting one another.

    The Decameron

  • Be of good cheare, and when thy strength is better restored, then referre the matter to me.

    The Decameron

  • After he had tasted of such cheare as they had, and was indifferently refreshed by the good fire; he discoursed his hard disasters to them, as also how he happened thither, desiring to know, if any Village or Castle were neere there about, where he might in better manner releeve himselfe.

    The Decameron

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.