Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Capable of being known.
  • adj. Liable to judicial investigation.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Capable of being known.
  • adj. Liable to judicial investigation.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Capable of being known.
  • Liable or subject to judicial investigation.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. capable of being known

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • There are people who give dinners, and who are not cognoscible.

    The Rise of Silas Lapham

  • He wonders why the physiologists of old, having such means of instruction, did not inquire into the secrets of nature: but judiciously concludes, that such questions would probably have been vain; “for, in matters cognoscible, and formed for our disquisition, our industry must be our oracle, and reason our Apollo.”

    Christian Morals

  • He is not only the first being, but the first and primary known, the primum esse and the primum cognoscible, as he is justly to be reckoned.

    The Whole Works of the Rev. John Howe, M.A. with a Memoir of the Author. Vol. VI.

  • "Quum enim ad cognitionem duo concurrant necessario, videlicet praesentia cognoscibilis et lumen quo mediante de illo judicamus, habitus cognoscitivi sunt quodammodo nobis innati ratione luminis animo inditi; sunt etiam acquisiti ratione speciei" -- "For as two things necessarily concur for cognition, namely, the presence of something cognoscible, and the light by which we judge concerning it, cognoscitive habits are in a certain sense innate, by reason of the light wherewith the mind is endowed; and they are also acquired, by reason of the species."

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 4: Clandestinity-Diocesan Chancery

  • What Berkeley does not seem to have so clearly perceived is that the non-existence of a substance of mind is equally arguable; and that the result of the impartial application of his reasonings is the reduction of the all to co-existences and sequences of phenomena, beneath and beyond which there is nothing cognoscible. "

    Thomas Henry Huxley; A Sketch Of His Life And Work

  • What Berkeley does not seem to have so clearly perceived is that the non-existence of a substance of mind is equally arguable; and that the result of the impartial application of his reasonings is the reduction of the all to co-existences and sequences of phenomena, beneath and beyond which there is nothing cognoscible.”

    Thomas Henry Huxley A Sketch Of His Life And Work

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Comments

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  • This word sounds like you're chewing, or at least your mouth moves like you're chewing. That seems very appropriate to me.

    May 25, 2009