Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A resident.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Ordinarily residing; inhabiting.
  • n. Inhabiting or occupying temporarily.
  • n. A resident.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Dwelling; ordinarily residing; inhabiting: now only in legal phraseology.
  • n. In the University of Cambridge, England, a graduate resident within the precincts of the university and a member of the senate, but not belonging to a college.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • For we desire, among its rapidly multiplying subscribers, that our particular friend and kind critic, commorant in Washington, should duly receive and enjoy this present paper, undefrauded by any resident of the other one hundred and thirty of the name.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 05, No. 30, April, 1860

  • In pressing his project first on the British nation, both because he happened to be then commorant in England, and because that government and not ours had already adopted cheap postage as the rule for its home correspondence, he is not chargeable with any lack of a becoming respect for his own country.

    Cheap Postage

  • It must be shewn where the defendant was commorant, but sufficient if this be set forth in the libel; also the Lord Chancellor inclined to think, that after the writ has been issued out of Chancery, brought into B. JR., and there delivered to the sheriff, but not yet actually returned into B. A., this court, on a plain error appearing, may supersede or quash it.

    Reports of cases argued and determined in the High Court of Chancery, and of some special cases adjudged in the Court of King's Bench [1695-1735]

  • All medical services furnished by the town to indigent persons resident or commorant therein shall be performed by said town physician.

    Acts and resolves passed by the General Court

  • All medical services furnished by the town to indigent persons resident or commorant therein shall be per - formed by said town physician.

    Acts and resolves passed by the General Court

  • Francis remained at Cambridge only until his sixteenth year; and Dr. Rawley, his chaplain in after-years, reports of him that "whilst he was commorant in the University, about sixteen years of age (as his lordship hath been pleased to impart unto myself), he first fell into dislike of the philosophy of Aristotle; not for the worthlessness of the author, to whom he would ascribe all high attributes, but for the unfruitfulness of the way, being a philosophy (as his lordship used to say) only strong for disputatious and contentions, but barren of the production of works for the benefit of the life of man; in which mind he continued to his dying day."

    The Advancement of Learning

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