Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intransitive v. To concur; to agree.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Now, an answer to this story is that, however odd a word "condog" may appear, it will be found in Henry Cockeram's English Dictionarie, first published in 1623.

    Literary Blunders; A chapter in the "History of Human Error"

  • It is said that when the Doctor was compiling his work, and announced the word concurro to his amanuensis, the scribe, imagining from the sound that the six first letters would give the translation of the verb, said "Concur, sir, I suppose?" to which the Doctor peevishly replied, "Concur -- condog!" and in the edition of 1678 "condog" is printed as one interpretation of concurro.

    Literary Blunders; A chapter in the "History of Human Error"

  • The entry is as follows: ` ` to agree, concurre, cohere, condog, condiscend. ''

    Literary Blunders

  • Now, an answer to this story is that, however odd a word ` ` condog '' may appear, it will be found in Henry Cockeram's

    Literary Blunders

  • Its words date back to 1500, which is helpful for brushing up on Shakespeare-era lingo like condog, a verb traced to 1592 that means "to agree."

    TIME.com: Top Stories

  • < p 11 > announced the word _concurro_ to his amanuensis, the scribe, imagining from the sound that the six first letters would give the translation of the verb, said ` ` Concur, sir, I suppose? '' to which the Doctor peevishly replied, ` ` Concur -- condog! '' and in the edition of 1678 ` ` condog '' is printed as one interpretation of _concurro_.

    Literary Blunders

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