Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. That which follows by consequence or is logically deducible.
  • n. Deduction from premises; a corollary.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Following by consequence; consequent; deducible.
  • n. That which follows by consequence or is logically deducible; deduction from premises; corollary.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Following logically; obviously deducible.
  • n. A corollary; a proposition which follows immediately as a collateral result of another, and thus needs no separate proof.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And so it is a kind of consectary (216) of the great privilege and blessed estate of adoption.

    The Works of the Rev. Hugh Binning

  • And if the authors of them had sought for such amplification, as had no real existence, but consisted of mere words, it was possible to deduce the Second from the First in the form of a consectary.

    The Works of James Arminius, Vol. 1

  • In this consectary, therefore, nothing can be contained which does not agree with a man who is under the law.

    The Works of James Arminius, Vol. 2

  • From what has preceded, a consectary or consequence is deduced for the excuse of the law, in the following words: "If then, I do that which I would not, I consent unto the law that it is good."

    The Works of James Arminius, Vol. 2

  • The first consectary is, "if, then, I do that which I would not, I consent unto the law that it is good."

    The Works of James Arminius, Vol. 2

  • But if the clause be rendered in the second manner, then the sixteenth verse contains an exhortation in these words: "Walk in the Spirit;" and a consectary subjoined to the exhortation in these words: "And ye shall not fulfill the desires or lusts of the flesh."

    The Works of James Arminius, Vol. 2

  • He consents to the law that it is good; a consectary deduced.

    The Works of James Arminius, Vol. 2

  • The second consectary is, "Now then it is no more I that do it, but sin that dwelleth in me."

    The Works of James Arminius, Vol. 2

  • He then deduces once more the second consectary, in the twentieth verse: "Now if I do that I would not, it is no more I that do it, but sin that dwelleth in me."

    The Works of James Arminius, Vol. 2

  • In this consectary, we see, that the phrases, "to be under the law," and "not to fulfill the lusts of the flesh," are opposed to each other; for the latter of them is descriptive of the proper effect of the guidance of the Spirit.

    The Works of James Arminius, Vol. 2

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