Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A silvery metallic synthetic radioactive transuranic element. Its longest lived isotope is Cm 247 with a half-life of 16.4 million years. Atomic number 96; melting point (estimated) 1,350°C; valence 3. See Table at element.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A transuranic chemical element (symbol Cm) with an atomic number of 96.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. a radioactive transuranic element of atomic number 96, having an atomic weight of 247 for its most stable isotope (half-life 1.6 x 107 years). The chemical symbol is Cm.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a radioactive transuranic metallic element; produced by bombarding plutonium with helium nuclei

Etymologies

After Marie Curie and Pierre Curie.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Named after Pierre and Marie Curie. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Small point: firefox auto-spell check prefers curium over curiam, though it is not attempting anything other than a dictionary search.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » PC

  • A quick Westlaw search through Allcases (date 5/1/2010) confirms that “per curium” is still nonstandard: “Per curiam” gets 1427 hits, “per curium” only 10.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » PC

  • Yet “per curium” is common enough to be warning people against: A search through the Brief-All file (date 1/1/2010) reports 88 instances of “per curium.”

    The Volokh Conspiracy » PC

  • What I never understood is why people add in a parenthetical stating that the decision is a “per curiam” — or, for that matter, a “per curium.”

    The Volokh Conspiracy » PC

  • A tip for lawyers (and others): The standard phrase for certain kinds of unsigned court opinions is “per curiam,” not “per curium” — except perhaps in science fiction stories involving decisionmaking by artificially intelligent radioactive-element-driven quantum computers.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » PC

  • A tip for lawyers and others: The standard phrase for certain kinds of unsigned court opinions is “per curiam,” not “per curium” — except perhaps in science fiction stories involving decisionmaking by artificially intelligent radioactive-element-driven quantum computers.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » PC

  • A quick Westlaw search through Allcases date 5/1/2010 confirms that “per curium” is still nonstandard: “Per curiam” gets 1427 hits, “per curium” only 10.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » PC

  • A contemporary English speaker who uses “per curium” has made a simple mistake, and unless Latin comes back into everyday use, the Latin language will never evolve to embrace it.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » PC

  • Yet “per curium” is common enough to be warning people against: A search through the Brief-All file date 1/1/2010 reports 88 instances of “per curium.”

    The Volokh Conspiracy » PC

  • If a Latin speaker were to use the phrase “per curium,” he would mean “by or according to the city in Cyprus” i.e., Kourion.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » PC

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