Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To strip of a tag or tags; to remove the tags from.

Etymologies

de- +‎ tag (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • If they don't want to be associated with the picture, they "detag" themselves from it.

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  • Of course, if you choose to leave your Facebook privacy settings wide open, if you choose to befriend someone you only met once on holiday to Magaluf, and if you then compound the error by posting or failing to detag a photograph of yourself in a compromised state with a vodka luge, then there might be certain drawbacks.

    Is it time to leave Facebook?

  • You detag pictures of yourself together, and in some instances you might even DEFRIEND him (this is intense, although I did once have a boy block me entirely, mostly because he was unstable.)

    Meredith Fineman: Fifty First (J)Dates: Facebook Me.

  • But the service does offer a range of protections and controls including the option to detag locations, notifications if friends add your location and the option to disable Places entirely.

    Facebook Places location tool unveiled, sparking fresh privacy concerns

  • Athletes and other students concerned about their image have also learned to quickly troll Facebook after incriminating parties, seeking tagged photos of themselves that they, of course, detag.

    The Facebook Effect

  • He didn't manage to detag the Elephants pic before stealing it.

    B3ta

  • "hacking" Facebook Photos, it will likely tighten the controls on accounts that are tagging too much, showing a high detag signal, or getting reported frequently.

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  • "'I’m wearing all these totally awful ’90s clothes. I look like crap. And I’m like, Why are you people in my life, anyway? I haven’t seen you in 10 years. I don’t know you anymore!' She began furiously detagging the pictures — removing her name, so they wouldn’t show up in a search anymore."

    The New York Times, Brave New World of Digital Intimacy, by Clive Thompson, September 5, 2008

    September 8, 2008