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Etymologies

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Examples

  • He comes to London, and finding out that he is wrong with his "dhrink," he leaves out all the h's he can, and thus comes to

    Thackeray

  • Sally, the old servant, had been in the room for a considerable time during the morning, standing at the foot of the bed with a big tea-pot in her hand, and begging in a whining voice, from time to time, that ‘Miss Anty, God bless her, might get a dhrink of tay!’

    The Kellys and the O'Kellys

  • He comes here for what he wants to ate and dhrink, and I suppose the house is free to him as another.

    Castle Richmond

  • "All liquor must be settled for before the dhrink is served."

    Slattery's Light Dragoons

  • We're goin 'to fight tomorry, an' it may be it's the last chance we'll have for a dhrink, unless there's more lik'r now in the other worrld than

    The Brigade Commander

  • With that all the neighbors thought he was cracked, and faith the poor wife herself thought the same, when he kem home in the evenin ', after shpendin' every rap he had in dhrink, and swaggering about the place, and lookin 'at his hand every minit.

    Half-Hours with Great Story-Tellers

  • "Byes," said Jem, who was troubled at the possible scandal he was about to give, "I promised not to dhrink in a public house; and shure this isn't a public house, glory be to God!"

    My New Curate

  • 'I've a pint bottle of the rale stuff, and some boiled eggs, and we'll soon have a couple of the shells emptied, in the shake of a lamb's tail, and thin we'll change clothes and dhrink to your safe journey.'

    Adrift in the Ice-Fields

  • Dan! 'says he, laughin'; 'an' what id you like to dhrink now? '

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 14, No. 390, September 19, 1829

  • Moses, 'says he,' ye'll not go out ov my house till ye dhrink my health; 'so wid that he mounted down off his throne, an' wint to a little black cupboard he had snug in the corner, an 'tuck out his gardy vine an' a couple of glasses.

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 14, No. 390, September 19, 1829

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