Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The view that there are true contradictions, i.e. true statements whose negations are also true.

Etymologies

Coined by Graham Priest and Richard Routley, from Ancient Greek di ("two"). + aletheia ("truth"), in 1981 (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • (A detailed discussion of some modern objections to dialetheism.)

    Dialetheism

  • As such, dialetheism opposes the so-called Law of Non-Contradiction (LNC) (sometimes also called the Law of Contradiction).

    Dialetheism

  • In fact, Hegel was driven to embrace dialetheism by his assessment of Kant's achievements in the Critique of Pure Reason.

    Dialetheism

  • (Contains some discussion of most of the motivations for dialetheism.)

    Dialetheism

  • Actually, that dialetheism challenges the LNC needs qualification, since the LNC is accepted as a general logical law in the mainstream versions of the theory.

    Dialetheism

  • Though dialetheism is not a new view, the word itself is.

    Dialetheism

  • As a challenge to the LNC, therefore, dialetheism flies in the face of what most philosophers take to be common sense.

    Dialetheism

  • In Western Philosophy, a number of the Presocratics endorsed dialetheism.

    Dialetheism

  • Given that trivialism is absurd, which has been granted in this entry (though why this is so is not as easy a question as it might appear: see Priest, 2000, and Priest, 2006, Ch. 3), dialetheism must be rejected.

    Dialetheism

  • There certainly are various other arguents against dialetheism in the philosophical market.

    Dialetheism

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • Oh, and on the origins: 'Though dialetheism is not a new view, the word itself is. It was coined by Graham Priest and Richard Routley (later Sylvan) in 1981... The inspiration for the name was a passage in Wittgenstein's Remarks on the Foundations of Mathematics, where he describes the liar sentence (‘this sentence is not true’) as a Janus-headed figure facing both truth and falsity... Hence a di-aletheia is a two(-way) truth. Unfortunately, Priest and Routley forgot to agree how to spell the ‘ism’, and versions with and without the ‘e’ appear in print.'

    November 20, 2007

  • From Philosophical Pontifications: 'Dialetheism, for those not in the know, is the thesis that that some contradictions are true. It is platitudinous that some of the things people say are true and others false—and some, dialetheists add, are both true and false.'

    November 20, 2007